PM Transcripts

Transcripts from the Prime Ministers of Australia

Menzies, Robert

SPEECH BY RT. HON. SIR ROBERT MENZIES, KT, CH. QC. MP ON MALAYSIA DEFENCE

Photo of Menzies, Robert

Menzies, Robert

Period of Service: 19/12/1949 to 26/01/1966

More information about Menzies, Robert on The National Archive website.

Release Date: 25/09/1963

Release Type: Statement in Parliament

Transcript ID: 814

COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA.
SPEECH. BY
Rt. lion. SIR ROBERT MENZIES,
M. P.
ON
MALAYSIA DEFENCE.
[ From the Parliamentary Debates," 25th September, 1963.]
MALAYSIA DEFENCE.
Ministerial Statement.
Sir ROBERT MENZIES ( Kooyong-
Prime Minister)-by leave-I present to the
House the following papers:-
Malaysia Defence-
Anglo-Malayan Defence Agreement of 1957.
Notes exchanged between Australia and
Malaya in March and April, 1959.
United Kingdom Malaysia Agreement of
July, 1963 ( excluding Annextires).
Notes exchanged between Australia and
-Malaysia in September, 1963.
In reference to the last of these papers,
I point out that in answer to a question
last week, I summarized the effect of these
notes exchanged between Australia and
Malaysia. In substance I then said that
our existing arrangements with Malaya
would now apply to Malaysia.
It may be remembered that so far back as
April, 1955, the Government emphasized
the importance of Malaya to the security of
the zone in which we live, and pointed out
that in consequence, Malayan integrity and
defence were matters from which we could
not and should not stand aloof. Reasons of
this kind, directly affecting us, were of
course, closely allied with the proper
interests of others-who are our friends.
The establishment of the Commonwealth
Strategic Reserve, of Seato-to the functions
of which the Reserve was relevant-the
9633/ 63. negotiations of the Anzus pact, are all in the
same pattern. That is a pattern, not of
aggression, but of defence; not of isolation
in defence, but of -common effort for the
common security.
There has been some suggestion that our
forces in Malaya went there primarily for
purposes of internal security. This is not
so. As I have indicated, they went there
and are there as a part of a strategic reserve
with the United Kingdom and New Zealand
and as a contribution to the defence of the
South-East Asian area. True, we,-quicly
agreed that our forces could be employed
in operations against the Communist terrorists
in Malaya. They were so employed,
with success, and with great credit to themselves
and Australia. The facts were, of
course, that these terrorists were promoted
and supplied by Communist authorities outside
Malaya, and that their activities were
as much acts of war against the territorial
and political integrity of Malaya as would
have been overt military invasion. We think
that the people of Australia have agreed
with these policies and decisions. In all
these arrangements, and in any to be made,
the usual rule will apply that the employment
of' Australian forces remains under the
control of the Australian Government. We
have acted and will continue to act consistently
with the Charter of the United
Nations.

But Malaysia, the new nation, is here.
The processes of its creation have been
democratic. The United Nations Secretary-
General, having appointed suitable persons
as examiners, reported that the people of
North Borneo and Sarawak desired incorporation
into Malaysia. The Prime Minister
of Singapore, one of the great sponsors of
Malaysia, has just received an overwhelming
endorsement at the polls. We have
publicly and unambiguously said that we
support Malaysia which is, never let it be
forgotten, a Commonwealth country, just as
our own is. Should there be any attempts
to destroy or weaken Malaysia by subversion
or invasion, what should Australia do about
it? -We know that the United Kingdom
accepts, in substance, the position of a
military guarantor. Honorable members
now know the terms of our own recent
exchange of notes.
The Government of Malaysia has said
clearly that this exchange is completely satisfactory
to it. But it has not been the normal
practice of Commonwealth countries to
spell out in detail their sense of mutual
obligation, nor to confine themselves to
legal formulae. For example, our vital
engagements with the United Kingdom are
not written or in any way formalized. Yet
we know and she knows that in this part
of. the world * we look to her, and she looks
to. us. We each apply in a spirit of mutual
confidence a golden rule. of . mutual
obligation. But for the benefit of all concerned,
honorable members would not wish me to
create or permit any ambiguity about Australia's
position in relation to Malaysia. I
therefore, after close deliberation by the
Cabinet, and on its behalf, inform the House
that we are resolved, and have so informed
the Government of Malaysia, and the
Governments of the United Kingdom and
New Zealand and others concerned, that if,
in the circumstances that now exist, and
which may continue for a long time, there
occurs, in relation to Malaysia or any of
its constituent States, armed invasion or subversive
acti v ity-sup ported or directed or
inspired from outside Malaysia-we shall
to the best of our powers and by such means
as shall be agreed upon with the Government
of Malaysia, add our military assistance
to the efforts of Malaysia and the
United Kingdom in the defence of Malaysia's
territorial integrity and political independence.
Inow present the following paper:-
Malaysia Defence-Ministerial Statement,
September, 1963.
Motion ( by Mr. Adermann) proposed-
That the House take note of the papers.
Debate ( on motion by Mr. Calwell)
adjourned. S~ r Robert Menzies.-Perhaps I may be
permitted to say that copies* of what I have
just said and of the documents referred to
will be available at once for a0 honorable
members.
By Authority: A. J1. ARTmuR, Comnmonwealth Government Printer, Canberra.

Transcript 814

FOR PRESS: P.M. 74/1963 - RESTRUCTIVE TRADE PRACTICES LEGISLATION - STATEMENT BY THE PRIME MINISTER, THE RT. HON. SIR ROBERT MENZIES

Photo of Menzies, Robert

Menzies, Robert

Period of Service: 19/12/1949 to 26/01/1966

More information about Menzies, Robert on The National Archive website.

Release Date: 15/09/1963

Release Type: Media Release

Transcript ID: 811

6 3/ 097
FOR PRESS: P. M. 24/ 1263
RESTRICTIVE TRADE PRACTICES LEGISLATION
Statement-by the Pme Minister. the Rt. Hon, Sir RobertI1enzes
Hysterical statements by the Leader of the
Opposition, Mr. Calwell, such as his comment on my address to
the Dinner of the New South Wales Chamber of Manufactures, serve
only to exhibit his over-excited state of mind.
It was made quite clear, when the first statement
was made on restrictive practices policy in the House of
Representatives, that it was a general description of the kind
of ideas the Government had. That statement was deliberately
designed and timed to give ample opportunity for criticism and
discussion before a bill was drafted for consideration by the
Parliament. Sir Garfield Barwick, the Attorney-Gencral, has
himself carried out this idea with enormous vigour. He has met
organisations and groups of people in every State to 01-icit and
discuss points of criticism, so that the Government might have
them in mind before proceeding to the actual work of precise
dra ftsmans hip. W4hen we recently saw the representatives of the
Manufacturing Industries Advisory Council which, I should
point out, is a standing body set up by the Government to give
it advice those present for the Governnent were the Minister
for Trade, Mr, McEwen, the Treasurer, Mr. Holt, the Minister
for National Developmenu;, Sir William Spooner, the Att%, orney-
Genra, Sir Garfield Barwick, the Minister for Primary
Industry, Mr. Adermann, and myself, We all thought ti1iat the
views presented on behalf of the M. I. A. C.-on the precise nature
of which neither the Government nor the Council has made any
statement were the most balanced and constructive tihat we
had had presented to us. We will undoubtedly find them of great
advantage to us in considering what the final shape of the
legislation should be, As I said in Sydney, I regard this
kind of consultation as of great value in clarifying issues
and helping to achieve a sound and positive result.
In the light of the foregoing it is quite clear
that Mr. Calwellts strange attempt to suggest that Sir Garfield
Barwick has been in some way rebuffed is the product of pure
imagination; or at any rate of imagination.
All Ministers had a hand in designing the
original general statement and all will have a hand in the final
outcome. I repeat that nobody has done half as much in
this matter as has Sir Garfield in seeking out the points of
criticism and in trying to achieve ultimately a result which
will be sensible and fair to the community as a whole.
CANBERRA September, 1963.

Transcript 811

FOR PRESS: P.M.NO.73/1963 MALAYSIA STATEMENT BY THE PRIME MINISTER, THE RT, HON. SIR ROBERT MENZIES

Photo of Menzies, Robert

Menzies, Robert

Period of Service: 19/12/1949 to 26/01/1966

More information about Menzies, Robert on The National Archive website.

Release Date: 15/09/1963

Release Type: Media Release

Transcript ID: 810

FOR PEESS~ P. M. No. r73/ 1961
MALAYS IA
Statement by the Prime Minister the Rt. Hon. Sir Robert Menzies
" Australia welcomes the new Federation of Malaysia
which comes into being tomorrow. We wish it well in every
way and believe that it will contribute to the welfare and
prosperity of its people. The joining together of the -three
former British territories of Singapore, Sarawak and North
Borneo ( or Sabah as it is now to be called) with the independent
Federation of Malaya to form Malaysia represents a population
increase for the new Federation of 3,000,000 people and the
addition of a wide diversity of economic resources and skills.
Malaya has made great progress since it received independence
in August, 1957 and has shown its ability to build a free and
prosperous nation, I am confident that the accretion of the
three new states will give great scope for development to all
of them. I have attempted to sum up my own views and what
I think are the views of all Australians in the following
message which I am sending to the Prime Minister Designate
of Malaysia, Tunku Abdul Rahman, todaytWe
in Australia have expressed a clear and
continuing conviction that the establishment of
Malaysia would be a welcome and progressive development
in the history of South East Asia. Events of this
magnitude do not take place without frictions and
hazards. You and the other representative leaders
of the constituent elements of Malaysia have
maintained your dedication and belief in what you
believe to be best for your peoples. Now Malaysia
has been brought into existence as a throat to none
and a positive factor for stability and progress.
The contacts and associations between our
Governments and peoples have been many and close,,
They have been marked by feelings of mutual goodwill
and, on our part, by respect for and appreciation of
your achievements in the few short years since
indepondence. The main features which distinguish
the performonce wise and tolerant government,
free institutions and policies of economic growth
and social development provide a good augury for the
future of the new and wider Federation,'
Sir Robert said he also wished to comment on the
report issued by the Secretary-General of the United Nations,
U Thant, on thne findings of his representatives concerning the
wishes of the peoples of Sarawak and Sabah ( North Borneo) with
regard to the inclusion of their territories in Malaysia.
The Prime Minister expressed his satisfaction that
the United Nations Secretary-General had confirmed in such
unmistakable terms what the Australian Government had believed
to be true, namely, that the substantial majority of the peoples
of the territories of Sabah and Sarawak were in favour of Malaysia.
Both in public statemonts and in diplomatic exchanges the Australian
Government had expressed their conviction that this wa-s the case. / 2

-2-
The Prime Minister recalled how the role of the
United Nations Secretary-General in the affair had originated.
The Foreign Ministers of Indonesia and the Philippines at their
meeting in Manila in June told the Malayan representatives that
" they would welcome the formation of Malaysia provided the
support of the people of the Borneo territories is ascertained
by an independent and impartial authority, the Secretary-General
of the United Nations or his representative." Later the
Heads of Goverrmient of Indonesia, Malaya and the Philippines,
meeting in Manila laid down the torms under which they would
request U Thant o carry out this task of ascertainment.
This task has now been fully discharged.
The Prime Minister went on to say that the
Malayan Government as well as the Governments of Britain and
the Borneo territories had done everything that might reasonably
be expected to gain acceptance of Malaysia by its neighbours.
The Secretary-GeneralTs findings were regarded by the Australian
Government as deciding this question beyond further argument.
It was obvious that his representatives had
discharged their functions with great care and sense of
responsibility and the Australian Government strongly hoped
that the findings would be accepted by the Governments concerned.
The Australian Minister for External Affairs, Sir
Garfield Barwick, had made abundantly clear to Indonesian leaders,
during the last few days, Australia's position on these matters.
CANBERRA, September, 1963.

Transcript 810

FOR PRESS: P.M. NO. 72/1963 - VISIT TO HER MAJESTY QUEEN ELIZABETH THE QUEEN MOTHER

Photo of Menzies, Robert

Menzies, Robert

Period of Service: 19/12/1949 to 26/01/1966

More information about Menzies, Robert on The National Archive website.

Release Date: 13/09/1963

Release Type: Media Release

Transcript ID: 809

63/ 096
P1M. No. 72/ 1963
VISIT OF BER MAJESTY QUEEN ELIZABETH
THEI QUEEN MOTHER
tatement ba lthe Prime ainiste the, Rt. lHon. Sir Robert Menzies
Mr. J. H. Scholtens, Chief Ceremonial
Officer of the Prime Minister's Department, has been
appointed by the Commonwealth Government to be Commonwealth
Director of the arrangements for the visit to Australia
next February/ March by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth The Queen
Mother. The Headquarters of the Royal Visit Organisation
will be at Canberra in the Prime Minister's Department.
CANBERRA, 13th September, 1963.

t 7. 1
I
I 0
0

Transcript 809

CHAMBER OF MANUFACTURES OF NEW SOUTH WALES ANNUAL DINNER HELD AT THE AUSTRALIA HOTEL SYDNEY, ON 12TH SEPTEMBER, 1963. - SPEECH BY THE PRIME MINISTER, THE RT. HON. SIR ROBERT MENZIES

Photo of Menzies, Robert

Menzies, Robert

Period of Service: 19/12/1949 to 26/01/1966

More information about Menzies, Robert on The National Archive website.

Release Date: 12/09/1963

Release Type: Speech

Transcript ID: 808

CHAMBER OF M4ANU3FACTUR~ ES OF NEhJ SOUTH WALLS
ANNUAL DINNER HELD AT THE AUSTRALIA HOTEL
SYDNEY, ON 12T1H SEPTEMBER, 1963.
Speech by the Prm iitr h t ~ oL ~ rRbr eze
Sir, Your Excellency and Gentlemen:
I am in a very difficult position tonight, In the
first place, I am not accustomed to making speeches ( Laughter).
In the second place, I am in the presence of a bunch of fellows
who have almost counted me out on one or two occasions in the
past ( Laughter) which I must say I enjoyed. In the third
place, I Learned at the last moment that the man who has the
great advantage of being the second last speaker who is proposing
the toast of " The Guests" is unhappily not here -John Walker
and his place is being taken by my favourite pupil, John Hurley.
( Laughter) And perhaps, therefore, I ought to begin with John
Hurley, because, last week I think it was, I was in Papua and
Now Guinea and when wve got up into the Highlands of New Guinea,
we saw a great number of people whose garments wore slightly
sketchy. ( Laughter) They looked rather like B~ ondi or Manly,
and as I was taken around, I said to my friends who, I hope,
understood me, I said " You know, John Hurley would do no
business in ths country," ( Laughter) Then as I thought what
might be done if we do our' duty by Papua and New Guinea, I
thought that I would like to be out of office by that time and
take a few shares in Johnts business. ( Laughter) ' dell, I just
leave that to you, you understand these things so much better
than I do. That after all is a minor trouble. I knew that
I was coming down here this week and I knew that my old and
bitter enemy, Bob lieffron, would be here ( Laughter), flushed
with success from an overseas journey ( Laughter) and I opeiqed
my paper you know, you chaps who just go on making profits,
you don't understand this but there is nothing a politician
likes more than to enjoy the misories of other people ( Laughter)
and every now and thcn you encounter a state of affairs in
which the other fellow is able to do something that you canft
do. Now, here am I there's no news, there's no novelty about
this remark I have a majority of one ( Laughter), a state of
affairs to which all of you, in your various ways, contributed.
( Laughter) And I opened my paper -I hesitate to say which
one because they arc all here ( Laoughter)-and I read that my
old and friendly enemy, Bob Heffron has stood up on the floor
of the House and has said to a supporter, a somewhat doubtful
supporter perhaps I don't know ( Laughter) I mean, we all
have those ( Laughter) and with a sweeping gesture has also
said to the Leader of the Opposition, " You can hava him"
( Laughter) I didn't feel too good about this, ( Laughter)
I didn't think I had quite come to the point of living on the
crumbs that fall from the rich man's table ( Laughter), He has
got a majority of X plus Y plus Z; I have a majority of one.
( Laughter) If you wake up some morning and you open your
favourite journal and you see " Menzies said to So-a-nd-so
' Leave and Join the Opposition" then you will know that I
am going to have an election ( Laughter) ( Applause)
Therefore, Mr. Premier, I really felt that in spite
of the happy personal relations that you and I have had that
this was rubbing it in a bit. ( Laughter) Don't you think so?
. oee/

2.-
All of those of that opinion say " Aye" ( Voices " Aye") To
the contrary " No" the "~ Ayes" I have it.
Well, of course, this is politics, when you have an
enormous majority as before you got to work, I had ( Laughter)
you assume a rather gloomy attitude. Well, you know, you fear
the worst when you have a majority Of 32, but when you have a
majority of one, you assume a eupeptic appearance. One a
marvellous majorityl Marvellous4 And everybody says, " lIsn~ t
it wonderful to have a majority of one?" Now, I refer this
question, not necessarily to a Royal Commission ( Laughter) but
for some domestic investigat io ntohePmirfNeSuh
Wales the simple question, Doc or, being What does it feel
like to have a majority of one? And when we ore both kicked out,
old boy, if I am still alive, I will write you a little essay
on that matter. Anyhow, that's enough of that kind. of nonsense.
My job tonight is to propose the Toast of Australian
Industry. I must say, gentlemen, that I admire tne skill with
which you use these general tezt. s _ Austral-ian Industry becaluse
if you printit with a capital then, Of course it includes
primary industry, secondary industry, tertiary inaustry, public
industry, private industry, and my task is to propose the toast
of the lot which means, in reality, that I am up here to propose
the toast of Australia and triis, I think, is a very honourable
task, But having mentioned all the capital I might
perhaps be allowed to add a small I also propose the toast
of " personal industry" in Austr3lia because in reality, whon
we have got over all the political arguments, the truth remains7
doesn't it that the future of this country your country, my
country the present and the future both do. pend on hew far the
primary industry, secondary industry, tertiary industry, public
industry private industry and personal industry conspire together
for the luture of the country. This is quite right, because
unless all of thnese things march together then the development
and gr~ owth of Australia will not be what It should be.
Now, of course7 people like to hoar you say what
ought to be done, but a grea~ t deal has been done. I know that in
any country like our own a marvellous country there are
builders and there are " knockers". I make no expression of
disrespect to my old friend whom I have never met, Mr. Whelan the
Wrecker ( Laughter) " Whelan the Wrecker was because
I know a certain amount of wrecking is necessary before a building
goes up. But really, I think we all ought to take a little timie
off occasionally to ask ourselves whether we are " knockers" which
is easy, rather clever, quite simple. I have always been afraid
that when I finally go~ out of my present discontents and can
sit in an armchair in the corner of a club and say, " I dont
understand what these fools are about" well7 I hope I shall
understand how simple it will be to achieve a reputition as a
critic, But what goes on in Australia and what has gone on in
Australia is not to the credit of the " knockers" but to the
credit of the builders to the credit of the co-operators, to
the credit -of the people who have looked forward and who have
done their stuff and have seen a vision of what can occur in
Australia. Somebody on my staff, some faithful chap because
we all have a few faithful chaps reminded me only yesterday
that not long ago I went up to the North-4est of Western
Australia to the Ord River to the opening of the Kununurra Darn,
and this is a fascinating affair. It is still, in a sense,
e @ e eo 6*/

-3
experimental. It is experimental on a large scale. Here is a
part of Australia i~ n which a great river which from time to time
becomes rather exuberant can be dammed and can be distributed over
the countryside, over land which normally wouldn't grow very much.
And there you are you can see acres and hundreds of acres and
thousands of acres of land under cotton, under all sorts of
various crops sa-fflowor and so on, and you begin to realise
what hap~ ens in a dramatic way in Australia when water is applied
to an otherwise unpromising soil,
This, I found rather oxciting, and if you will allow
me the rare privilege that I have of quoting myself in my own
favour, T will quote what I said on that occasion, and that was,
and I commend this to everybody that the whole h-istory of
Australia is the history of the impossible becoming the possible,
of the possible becoming the probable and of the probable becoming
a living certainty ( Hear, hear) ( Applause). Whenever I read,
some months afterwards, something that I said, I am not like the
fellow who said " What a genius I had when I wrote those lines."
I usually sa1y, ? Take it away and burn it". But on this occasion,
I repeat it, and this might very well be our text, because her'e
I am proposing the Toast of Industry Industry with particular
reference, of course, to manufacturing industry which has had so
much to do with Australian development and will have more and more
to do in the future. But Industry.
Why do we take so much time off to argue with each
other about matters which are of no great importance when in
reality, what you and I have the groot privilege of engaging in
is the task of building a young country, in terms of population a
small country, in such a fashion, so generously, so ambitiously,
that in a hundred years' time, the people who then live in
Australia and who have a population of 60 to 70 million people
a great nation. a great people, a groat race will look back on
us and say " Well, at any rate, they had imagination. They laid
the foundations. They got together." Whenever I read the
history of another country the United States if you like, and
I have read a great deal of the history of the United States in
my time I am not so much interested in the things they disagreed
about except to identify them as I am about how far their
ideas coalesced to produce an immense result,
You knew, gentlemen the other day by some error on
somebodyts part, I was invited to deliver the Jefferson Lecture
at Monticello in the United States at Charlottosvillel Virginia,
and on behalf of my country, I took this as a compliment because
it is the first time anybody outside the United States has ever
been invited to do it. And so I brushed up my recollection of
he legal history of the early part of the United States and its
general history and it suddenly dawned on me that there was one
singular fact Thomas Jefferson, a very great man by any
measurement, great enough to incur hostility in any quarter today
( Laughter) Thomas Jefferson had been the American Minister
( they didn't have an Embassy in those days) in France. He came
back. He was the Draftsman of the American Declaration of
Independence. He was the First Secretary of State in Washington~ s
administration and, by any measurement George Washington was one
of the great men of modern history, full of courage, fortitude,
understanding and Thomas Jefferson was his Secretary of State.
And then later on he was Vice President of America and then for
two terms, he was President of the United States, When he first
became~ President of the United States, he presided ever a United
States of r5-million people. Please remaerbe r that. Five and a
half million people. 909 69/

I, for some reason or another that you may analyse
in my absence, have been Prime Minister of Australia for some
years and today, we have 11 million pc ople. Eleven million
people. We sometimes feel, don't we, that eleven million poople
is a very small number of people. We are a small country.
Compar'e us with the vast masses of people. We are no great shakes
after all. If Jefferson had said that if Jefferson had written
off the United States because it had afmillion people, the whole
history of the world would have been a1tered. Make no mistake
about it. We, in Australia, with 11 million people, with all the
advantages that we have in life, with all the prospects that we
have in the future, have a tremendous opportunity, provided wie
pre prepared as individuals to apply industry to work, to sweat,
not to ask too much for too little 2 but to feel that we , sre building
a nation which will someday be as important in the world as the
United States of America is today. Look, if we could only understand
this, this is something tremendous.
I know thore are a lot of poople who say, " Well, we
live we die we are buried and so what." You know, if we really
all thought that, if we really all thought that, it would be a
pretty dyspeptic sort of life, wouldn't it? Here today and gone
tomorrow. I am not engaging in arguments about theological
matters, whether people believe in a future life or not is their
own business, I do, But it is their own business. But the
greatest disbeliever in a future life in some astral sphere must
still believe that what we are doing today in Australia must have
some effect on what happens in Australia in fifty years' time;
in other words that we have our contribution to make whether we
know about it Irom some other place or we don't, whether we are
recognised for it or we are not. These things dontt matter all
that much, The truth of the matter is that we are doing something,
we are building something for the future. A'nd our great-grandchildren
may net think about us at all except when they go and
see some plaque in my case and say, " Well old great-greatgrandfather,
hr. adafonain tn. Well that doesn.' t
matter very much,, Foundation stones don't matter very much.
I'd like them to feel that you and I, in our generation, had laid
more than foundation stones, that we h( ad done something to build
industrially, in all its aspects, a great country. Then we willj
from wherever we arc you in Heaven., I in Hell ( Laughter) -' we
will, in somne mysterious fashion, perhaps? become conscious of
it. But this requires not only great faith and great energy and
very little narrowness of mzind, very little dwelling on the
particular interest at the moment; this requires a broad mnind
and a constructive sense,
Sir, I was up the other day in Papua and New Guinea
and here is a country which presents us with a challenge. We
have been tremendously assisted in our consideration of our
problems in that country by a group of meon led by Jimr Kirby
( Sir James Kirby) who went up there not long ago and had a look
at it; and only the ether day by a professional group from the
World Bank who went there and will in due course present us with
a report on it.
We can't look at ourselves as if we were in a watertight
compartment. A1re we to look at Australia and say " Well
our groat ambition is to be purely self-contained noboly else
need apply; nobody else need compete" 9 Are we io say that to
Papua and Now Guinea? Are we to say to this country for which
we have accepted the greatest international responsibilities in
a e * 1

our history a task which is overlooked by people, many of whom
would love to see us fail are we to say, " Well, what happens to
Papua-New Guinea doesn't matter very much. They can grow rubber
they can grow tea" and I think they'll grow more and mora of i
" they can grow coffee, they can grow cocoanuts, copra, they can
grow cattle." Well, all these things are at their very beginning,
but you can never think of the problem of Papua-New Guinea as if
this country were isolated from us, as if we could treat it for all
purposes as if it were a foreign country because it is not a
foreign country, Papua-New Guinea is the greatest responsibility
that this country of ours has ever taken on in the eye of international
judgment. And therefore I was delighted when distinguished
members of your own from Sir James Kirby down went and had a look
at this business, went and made valuable reports on it. Never
lot us get too bedded down on the immediate problems that we have,
although they are important. Of course they are important.
But let us all of us you, I, all the rest of us feel that
the judgment that will be applied to us is not the judgment of
the shareholders at your next general meeting, or the judgment
of the electors at my next general election, but will be the
judgment of people, in the long run, who say, '" Jhat did these
ancestors of ours, what did these predecessors do as builders
not only in Australia but elsewhere,"
Now, the only other thing I want to say to you is this,
Sir. I have spoken too long, but this exercises ny mind or
what passes for my mind. There has been a great deal of hurroosh
I don't know how to spell that word but it sounds all right
( Laughter) about the problem of restrictive practices, of trade
practices. ( Laughter) That's right, this rings a bell. ( Laughter)
And of course all this problem evokes two classes of people who
dont matter. One the people who say, " I'm against it, whatever
it is." Well, that's silly. There are others who say, " I don't
understand what it is but I am in favour of it" and that doesn't
matter. What I have been interested to discover in the last
year, is that very, very few people come along an say, " I'm
against anything." The people who count on this matter are the
people who say, " Well, yes, there are some things that are done
that ought not to be done but a real important problem is to
discover what they are, how sensibly a scheme may be developed
on those matters," and I like those people for the very simple
reason that I think they are very sensible and I would like to
toll you that in the middle of all the hurroosh, we had last week
a discussion no, it was this week, last Monday with representatives
of the Manufacturing Industries Advisory Council, their
spokesman being Mr. Irish, and we had put to us the most balanced,
sensible and impressive body of ideas on this matter that I have
yet heard and I would like to say that on behalf of the Government
we are very grateful for this.
We are not dogmatic on this matter, we are not
doctrinaire on this matter. Indeed, we are like you. We want
to preserve competition and, so far as we can, with good sense,
eliminate unfairness and injustice. Well, it is easy enough to
say that in the broad. When you come down to the point as to
how you are to do it, you get to a problem which will, in due
course, exercise the Governments of the States who have exactly
the same interest as we have on this matter and whose co-operation
is essential in this field, and all I want to tell you is that
what has been said to me and to ry colleagues in the last few
days has been so constructive and so helpful that I think it may
well determine the future course of action. ( Applause) / 6

6
Sir, when I was coming here tonight my wife said
to me because she has gone to see somebody else " How
late do you think you will be?" And, I said, " Oh, I don't
know. About half past ten" and the driver, who knows me
of old, said relevantly, though perhaps impertinently, he
said, ' Well Sir, ( one of the great advantages of
life is that the driver calls you " Sir" ( Laughter) he said,
" Sir, the year before last it was a quarter to twelve and
last year it was a quarter past twelve," So I said to my
wife, " All right, my dear. When you have seen as much as
you want to see of Earthy or whatever her name is
( Laughter) you go home. And, therefore, in the meantime Sir,
thanking you for your usual and marvellous hospitality. I
will invite all my temporary collaborators ( Laughter) to
stand up and drink with me the Toast of Australian Industry.
I_

Transcript 808

WEEK ENDING SEPTEMBER 7, 1963 - INDEX OF MINISTERIAL STATEMENTS ISSUED IN CANBERRA

Photo of Menzies, Robert

Menzies, Robert

Period of Service: 19/12/1949 to 26/01/1966

More information about Menzies, Robert on The National Archive website.

Release Date: 07/09/1963

Release Type: Index

Transcript ID: 804

WEEKLY INDEX No, 36
WEEK ENDING September 7,1963
COMMONVWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA
Index of Ministerial Statements Issued in Canberra
The Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Trade, The Rt. Hon.
John McEwen
Sept. 2 No. 850B JAPANESE MARKET FOR AUSTRALIAN FOODSTUFFS
4 No. 858A CODE FOR OVERSEAS INVESTORS
The Minister for National Development, Senator the Hon, Sir
William Spooner, M. M.
Sept. 1 No. 848
4 No. 853 GROWTH OF PETROLEUM REFINING INDUSTRY
SNOWY MEN HOME FROM SOUTH-EAST ASIA
The Minister for Defence, the Hon. Athol Townley.
Sept. 4 No. 857 IMPERIAL DEFENCE COLLEGE 1964 COURSE
5 No. 861A ATTENDANCE OF AUS. OFFICER AT U. S. ARMED FORCES
The Postmaster-General, The Hon. C. W. Davidson STAFF COLLEGE
Sept. 3 No. 852
7 No. 863 NEW POSTAGE STAMPS
OFFICIAL OPENING COMMERCIAL TELEVISION
STATION RTQ, CHANNEL 7, ROCKHAMPTON.
The Minister for Immigration, The Hon. A. R. Downer
Sept. 6 No. 862550 BRITISH MIGRANTS WOULD DISEMBARK
FROM " FAIRSEA" AT ADELAIDE ON SEPTEMBER 7.
The Minister for External Affairs, The Hop. Sir Garfield Barwick
1 No. 849 AUSTRALIAN DIPLOMATIC APPOINTMENTS
1 No. 850 OPERATION PLOUGHSHARE
2 No. 850A UNITED NATIONS GENERAL ASSEMBLY 1963
AUSTRALIAN DELEGATION
6 No. 864 SEATO DAY, 1963
6 No. 864B FRENCH PROTECT ON NUCLEAR TESTS
The Minister for Primary Industry, The Hon. C. F. Adermann
No. 860 MEAT PRODUCTION, EXPORTS RISE
No. 861 ALL BULK WHEAT EXPORTS TO BE INSPECTED
The Minister for the Army, The Hon. J. O. Cramer
No. 854 ARMY'S NEW SUMMER DRESS
No. 855 DEAiTH LYING IN THE GRASS
The Minister for the Interior. The Hon. Gordon Freeth
No. 858 AUCTIONS OF A. C. T. RESIDENTIAL LELSES
The Minister. for the Navy, Senator the Hon. J. G. Gorton
No. 859
No. 847
No. 851 TWO NAVY LAUNCHINGS
NEW NAVY CHART FOR HOBART
N. Z. WARSHIP TRAINS WITH R. A. N. / 2
Sept. I, tI, i
Sept. 55
Sept. 44
Sept. 4
Sept. 51
3

-2-
The Minister for Health, Senator the Hon. Harrie W. Wade
Sept. 1 No. 846 AUSTRALIAN DELEGATION TO W. 1I. O. REGIONAL
COMMITTEE
The Minister for Air, The Hon. David Fairbairn,
Sept. 4 No. 856 AIR FORCE WEEK
The Department of External Affairs
Sept. 6 No. 864A A ROAD TO THE ICE CAP
The Department of the Navy
Sept. 1 No. 847A STORMY PASSAGE FOR " CARBINE" CONVOY
3 No. 852A EXERCISE " CARBINE" COMMUNIQUE
With the Compliments of
The Government Public Relations Office,
Parliament House,
CANBERRA, A. C. T.

Transcript 804

BROADCAST BY THE PRIME MINISTER, THE RT. HON. SIR ROBERT MENZIES, AT PORT MORESAY, NEW GUINEA, AT 7.15 P.M ON 6TH SEPTEMBER, 1963

Photo of Menzies, Robert

Menzies, Robert

Period of Service: 19/12/1949 to 26/01/1966

More information about Menzies, Robert on The National Archive website.

Release Date: 06/09/1963

Release Type: Broadcast

Transcript ID: 802

63 9
BROADCAST BY T~ IE PRIME MINISTER THE, RT. HON.
SIR ROBERT iv NZIES, AT ' r-ORT MERLSY, NEW
GUINEA, AT 7.15 P. m. ON 6TH SEPTEMBER, 1963
Good Evening, Ladies and Gentlemen
I want to say something about the attitude of the
Australian Government to these territories.
We regard ourselves as trustees for Papua-New Guinea.
We are not colonialists in the old and now rejected
sense. We are certainly not exploiters we put into these
territories far more than we get out or perhiaps are ever likely
to get out. This year Australia will provide, by way of direct
grant, over œ-25M towards the cost of developing Papua-New Guinea
per cent, more than last year.
We are not oppressors. On the contrary, our dominant
aim is to raise the material, intellectual, social and political
standards and self-reliance of the indigenous peoples . to a point
at which they may freely and competently choose their own future,
There are some modern fashi., ns of thought that I have
encountered that political independence should precede economic
viability;
that democratic self-government is something that can
be created, artificially, from the top, and that it will
then find its way down to the grass roots; and
that speed is mauch more important than certainty or
security.
Now I think that you will agree that it is important that I should
say something about each of these propositions.
1 say freedom is an inborn right, and not a concession
by povuer. This means equality before the law, a free choice of
occupotion, freedom of association and so on.
But people who are, taken as individuals, free, are
not necessarily taken as members of a commijP, 1.. x ripe for political
independence. In a community sense, genuinely free institutions
of government are essential for the preservation of Indiidual
freedom, Recent years have produced instances we all know
them in which the grant of self-government has led to a form of
dictatorship or oligarchy, government by a few, in which the freedom
of the individual has been suppressed or gravely limited,
" Individual freedom" and " political independence" are
therefore not synonymous. They can, by the careful cultivation of
the various local and national means of organised self-government,
be made to co-exist -individual freedom and political independence
made to co-exist. This is our policy in Papua and New Guinea,
But, when considering political factors, we cannot
sensibly ignore the economic ones. To give a former colony or
territory political independence, while leaving it economically
dependent upon the actions of others, is to expose it to grave risks
soo/ 2

-2
of " loaded" assistance, undue political pressure from outside
nations or interests, a temptation to barter its freedom of
political action for cash or goods in hand.
That is why we regard the economic development of
Papua and New Guinea along lines which they can successfully
follow when political independence has been granted, as of vital
importance. Wat k nd of economicdevel ~ int do we eznyjq~ age_, and
what are its Drbems? I~ rtwe must carry on, with all thae speed which
humnan and material resources will permit, the basic work of educating
the people, not only for political citizenship, but also for
increased economic capacity; better knowledge of agricultural and
pastoral production, better technical skill, administrative
capacity at all levels.
Second, we must take all steps to make improved
techniques available to what I may call, in the well-known phrase,
the " man on the land". Not trying to convert every small sustjenance
tiller of the soil in some remote valley into a " cs crop"
aproducer; but at the same time increasing the number and capacity
Wof those producing cash crops, not only for improved living at home,
but for exports to earn some of the money needed for imports and
investment. Thrd On the economic side, we have to consider what
WI will call the three Tts Transport, Trade and Tariff.
The marketing capacity of the Territories! producers,
be they agricultural, pastoral, mineral, or processing, will be
profoundly affected by the means of transport. And in this
country, that means roads, air services coastal shipping facilities.
Much has been done; much more must be Aone in the future,
Export trade must be developed. with new markets,
particularly in the countries of the South-West Pacific and South
East Asia. This is tremendously important. The Commonwealth
S Department of Trade is constantly active in this field, but I agree
Wmuch remains to be done.
Trade with Australia, as distinct from these other
countries I've been mentioning, involves Tariff considerations which
are never slimple. Yet they must be solved as must be the problem
of non-Australian markets, if there is to Le industrial development
in Papua and New Guinea. Much thought is to be given to the-pattern
of such development if we are to see a proper economic growth in
these Territories on terms and conditions I want you to mark this
on terms and conditions which will be sustainable by an independent
and self-governing community in due course.
Fourth, we must encourage those settlers who have, over
the years, done so much to help the growth of the New Guinea economy
in production and commerce, Australia herself the mainland
needs and obtains much useful capital investment from overseas.
How much more do these Territories need it. Yet I know that we here
encounter a reluctance which proceeds from a feeling of uncertainty.
Can the man who invests the capital be reasonably sure of a proper
opportunity to secure the fruits of his enterprise? For myself,
I understand these doubts, though I cannot say that I share them in
any substantial sense. Now, why do I say this? You may say it is
easy enough to say it.
Well, I will refer to the defence of the territory
later on, I want to indicate that we, Australia, are not going to
be hurried out. We have a long job ahead of us and you have and
we intend to complete it. One of our great objectives is that when
Independence Day arrives, it will come in a spirit of friendship and
good will, in which the indigenous inhabitants will appreciate the
a* to 9/ 3

-3
investment and work of what I believe are called the expatriate
settlers, will realise how these have contributed to their social and
economic growth, and will wish to preserve them, Whether concr'ete
guar'antees or supports can be given to investors is, I need hardly
tell. you, a most complex matter. My colleague, Mr. Hasluck, whose
devotion to his difficult office wye all admire so much, has given this
problem a lot of attention. A group of leading businessmen from
Australia recently visited you. It has furnished a valuable report
which, as I saw it just a few hours before coming up here, I have not
yet had time to consider, but I know that it is valuable and suggestive,
The W orld Bank's Mission I hope to see in Canberra not long
after my return. I can tell you that in addressing ourselves to
this problem, we will have in our minds a clear belief that without
morp investment for development and production, these Territories will
just not have an economic strength to sustain political independence;
that it is our duty as a governiment to seek out and apply whatever
practical and reasonable measures can be devised orthodox or novel
to encourage and sustain confidence and growth through willing and
co-operative investment and effort.
In short, we want to work with you. We certainly will not
run away from you,
In spite of superficial critics, who know little or nothing
* of the vast complexities of a country with -a fringe of modern economic
acti~ vity and a deep hinterland of primitive civilisation and activity,
our tasks cannot be performed in a year or two. However great our
activity, it will be a long haul. There are hundreds of tribes and
languages, each with its own pattern of life. The job is not ' to
* destroy those patterns, but to adapt and modify them against the
background of better health and medical services, better education,
better means of transport, better knowledge of production.
Not one of these elements can be dealt with in isolation,
nor can they be forced upon distant and perhaps unreceptive people.
We have, all of us that means you as well as myself a lot to
study and a lot to learn about the ways and means of raising the
standards of primitive people while not blindly or stupidly assuming
that they will ultimately resemble, in social and economic structure,
Australia herself, Democrati. c self-government I now turn to the second
fashion that I referred to the pecular contribution of the Englishspeaking
people to social and political history, took centuries to
develop. With all the benefits of history and experience, such
Sprocesses can of course, nowadays, occur much more rapidly. But it
V is still true that you cannot create effective self-government merely
by setting up, by statute or otherwise, a form of parliament.
Democracy, my friends, is neither artificial nor easy. We have, I
think, been approaching this matter in the right way in the development
of local government and an increasingly representative Legislative
Council. At all stages we maintain contact with informed local
opinion, We are determined ~ o pursue these sensible processes,
" without fear, favour, or affection." We will at all times be ready
to receive advice and assistance in these tasks. But, as. the
paramount consideration, one which it is our absolute duty not to
forget, is the welfare of the people of these Territories, we will
be unwilling to accept orders to take some hasty step which would
cut across that duty. We will, in due course, take the decis4. on of
the people whose trustees we are.
Nothing of course, is more damaging to the growth of
independent institutions than armed attack or invasion. These
Territories have had bitter and devastating experience of that,
Well, on this aspect of the matter I repeat what I said recently
in Canberra, that: " We will defend these Territories as if they
were part of our mainland; there must be no mistaken ideas about
that." In that attitude, my friends, we have, as you know and as
you have recently been reminded, the staunch backing of our ANZUS
partner, the United States of America. 00* 004/ 4.

Now, it follows from what I have said that, in moving
tdwards self-government, speed is not more important than certainty
or security, This does not mean that we are to have a " go-slow"
policy. I once said that, if and when we reached a point at which
we felt that the people were approaching, getting very very close
to readiness for self-determination, but we were not sure, still
had a lingering hesitation, it would be better to ac-u then too soon
than too late, But we are as yet a long way from that stage, as
the leaders of the indigenous peoples have frequently agreed and as
indeed they have stated to me in the highlands in the last thirtysix
hours, We want a sound feeling about the wishes of the people of
these Territories. We want security for those who are now there, and
for those who are to come.
Meanwhile, nobody but a pure theorist could say that the
pace of progress is too slow, In the field of education, which is
by common consent very important, I will just give some facts you
know them but other people may not.
By 1958 the number of registered and recognised mission
schools was 274, By 1962 this is only four years later this
number had increased almost five-fold. Administration schools have
increased from 44 in 1951 to 431 in 1962, and of course much is being
done in secondary and technical schools. We are also having an
investigation at present about university possibilities. Meanwhile,
there are 88 post-primary and secondary schools, of which 20 are
technical. Here are the proofs of great headway under the helpful
administration of a nation ( our own) which, in the case of Papua and
New Guinea, rates its duty much higher than its rights.
And, I rapeat, it is rujsolutely determined to do its
duty by the whole of the people of the twin territories, indigenous
or otherwise. Now let me end up by saying this to you. In speaking
to you, one of the things I like to remember is that, while I speak
as the head of a Liberal and Country Party Administration with, as
you all know, a narrow majority, the Parliamentary approach to the
future of these Territories is not marked by deep differences. Some
of those who are listening to me tonight may, exercising a proper
privile ge, say " A plague on both your Housesi" l Well, please don't
think tha this sentiment makes you unique. I understand it, and
( if I may make a confidential remark, not to be repeated) have
occasionally thought so myself. But we are all, in a real sense,
and whatever our differences of race or politics, members of the
family. The neighbours cannot and should. not settle our domestic
problems for us. But, with sense and fortitude and understanding
and some imagination we can. I want -all of you to see this
to see our common in~ crests clearly and to serve them faithfully.
For in this way, my friends, we shall come to a happy and prosperous
future, Good night and good luck to you all.

Transcript 802

REGIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION HELD IN NEW GUINEA ON 5TH SEPTEMBER 1963 - SPEECH BY THE PRIME MINISTER, THE RT. HON. SIR ROBERT MENZIES

Photo of Menzies, Robert

Menzies, Robert

Period of Service: 19/12/1949 to 26/01/1966

More information about Menzies, Robert on The National Archive website.

Release Date: 05/09/1963

Release Type: Speech

Transcript ID: 801

63/ 090
REGIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE 4' ORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION
HELD IN NEd GUINEA
Oi 5TH SEPTEMBER. 1963
Speech by the Prime Minister. the Rt. Hon. Sir Robert Menzies
Sir Distinguished Representatives of your various Countries,
Ladies and Gentlemen My colleague, Senator Wade, rather glorifies me
this morning. He attributes my presence entirely to virtue on
my part. I would like to tell you that the last time I was
here though not in this building they did their best to kill
me. ? Laughter) They cooked me, they cooked me, they cooked me,
they ran me around and I agreed to come this time on strict
condition that the weather would be better. ( Laughter) And
so it is. So it is not only a matter of pure virtue but of
personal comfort. Sir, the Constitution of the World Health Organisation
not only contains those splendid words that were quoted by
my colleague, but they also contain a definition of health, and
SI read this with great interest. They describe " health" as a
W state of complete mental, physical and social well-being and not
merely the absence of disease or infirmity. I think most of us
must be rather unhealthy. " A state of complete mental, physical
and social well-being" Well, give those words an extensive
interpretation and they will cover almost all of the material
problems of mankind today and therefore they would tend to defeat
themselves. But what I like about the work of the W. H. 0 is that
it has not lost itself in generalisation it has rather concentrated
its mind upon the proposition that health in the nations
and among the people does not represent merely the absence of
* disease but includes these great activities to which my colleague
has referred. In brief, the World Health Organisation has not
been just academic in its approach to problems. On every occasion,
it has sought to give a practical application to the work of
medical scientists and discoverers and to give that practical
application in particular places for particular purposes.
I was informed before I came', here that 100 health
projects had been'assisted by the World Health Organisation in
the Western Pacific 100 different and specific projects.
N6w', Sir, having said that to indicate that I do understand the
essentially practical purposes that you have, I perhaps ought to
remind those of us who are not medical men that it is a'pretty
modern idea that public health problems are capable of solution,
I don't think that people troubled much about public health
problems, as we understand them, a couple of centuries ago. In
Great Britain the eighteenth century has become known as the
century of good taste, and indeed it was in many ways, but it
must have produced mrany bad tastes in its fashion. because public
health, as we understand it, was entirely unknown and indeed the
practice of medicine in any of its forms was extraordinarily
primitive. Indeed, one has only to go back to the middle of the
nineteenth century a period which'was well remembered by people
like my own parents, so that we are not so far removed from the
middle of the nineteenth century. Up to that time when the Red
Cross was created, when the great figure and genius of Florence
Nightingale became known nursing as we understand it, treatment
of the wounded, as we understand it, was . almost entirely unknown.
For the most'part in the dreadful occurrences of war, the wounded
were left to die; casualties which turned out to be fatal

2
casualties were enormous compared to what they would be under
similar circumstances today. And it was a good long time after
that before it was realised by the hard economic elements in the
community that disease is economically wasteful, that no country
can afford to have any disease which skill and effort can avert.,
that economically this wastage of the economic contribution made
by the individual is not to be tolerated. That is a very modern
idea, And so we have entered what we are pleased to believe
to be the modern and enlightened era of which the World Health
Organisation is a manifestation, with 115 members and a record of'L
immense vigour and practical quality. But Sir, the health work
of the modern world and the health work of the WJ. H. O. can't be
done in a vacuum, they can't be done extra-territorially. What we
all need to do, what you have shown you understand you must do, is
to get down to cases, not to be too abstract, not to regard any
problem as being capable of being solved in an office or a lab.
somewhere else in the world.
And, therefore, as I understand the W* H its main
function is to stimulate activity in specific areas and to a great
extent in relation to specific diseases of great endemic or
epidemic proportions. Your topic for this Conference is an
illustration of this fact, and when you have a conference you are
not merely engaging in a series of abstract remarks, you are
concentrating your attention on a particular problem and pooling
experience and skill7as it turns out here, from thirteen or fourteen
different countries. Now Sir, you happen to be in Australian territory and
I happen to be by the grace of the electors of Australia, though
only narrowly ILau ghter), the Prime Minister. Now, in these
Territories Papua and New G uinea we in Australia have accepted
great responsibilities responsibilities much too great to be cast
off our shoulders lighZ-heartedly or in a spirit of pure theory.
We have immense responsibilities in these Territories and vie
propose, of course, to discharge them. W4e look forward to the
time when these Territories, the people of these Territories will
be completely politically and economically independent, when they
will be a living vital country controlling their own destiny. : This
is the great objective of intelligent people in the twentieth
century. But in the meantime, we, the Government of Australia
have tremendous responsibilities and we will carry them forwarA to
a conclusion, not slowly, not in a wild hurry, always with the
understanding that the paramount consideration is the welfare of
the people of the Territories and not a mere desire to satisfy
somebody else, Now this is a health organisation conference and
therefore I should tell you that in the pursuit of this duty to
which I have referred, the Administration, while very far from
satisfied none of us can afford to be satisfied; if you were
satisfied about the state of health in the world, you wouldn't
be here; this is something about which you will never get
satisfaction and therefore the Administration is not satisfied,
but I venture to say that it can be very properly proud of what
has been done, remembering always that these Territories embrace
hundreds of different types of peoples, literally hundreds of
different languages, stages of civilisation or of uncivilisation
which-are perhaps not to be found very easily in any other part of
the world, ranging from what you see around you in Port Moresby
to what we naight see if we had the time and took the trouble and
had the endurance to go into some of the maore remote parts of
Papua and New Guinea. This is a tremendously difficult place and
soooe.. 0/ 3

3-
yet, I repeat, the Administration may be very proud of what has
been done. So far as we have been able to discover, there was
simply no evidence of any established medical system in this great
tract of country until European settlement first occurred. The
indigenous inhabitants, as was not uncommon perhaps at that stage
in the world's history, believed that disease was a product of
somae mysterious force, perhaps a sorcerer, perhaps some form of
witchcraft. There were rather obscure, almost instinctive and
superstitious ideas about how illness came about and how it ought
to be dealt with, In other words there was a state of affairs
here only a decade three, four decades ago, five decades ago
whic& strongly resembled the state of affairs which existed in a
great number of our countries hundreds and hundreds of years ago,
so that the task was a difficult one and had to be concentrated
into a fairly short period of time.
Well, by 1923 that's only forty years ago there
were in these Territories 14 hospitals and 13 medical officers.
No great matter was it? Fourteen hospitals, 13 medical officers
represented an enormous improvement on what had been but it was
still no great matter. Then the progress that followed was
interrupted by war because this country saw war and saw it in a
destructive form. Itve been reminded that the war destroyed every
hospital except those at Port Moresby and at Samarai. Here is a
splendid example, if that is the right word to choose of the
destruction that war can bring about. Only two hospitals left
standing. But of course the war also, by the strange irony of
fate or the not-always-unaerstood wisdom of Providence, brought
great advances in medicine with the anti-malarials and the
insecticides and the anti-biotics and the vaccines. I suppose that
two of the remarkable effects of the war were that in medical
science the discovery of how to fight disease was accelerated
beyond words while, at the same time, in the world of the physicist,
we saw results following upon the splitting of the atom which have,
up to now, rather increased the apprehensions of mankind but may,
in due course, properly understood, add enormously to its resources.
So there was a plus; there was a minus.
Well, Sir when the war was over the Administration
resaunmddh as p ese on with increasing activity ever since.
Great territory-wide campaigns by 195? were being waged against
yaws, against against malaria, leprosy there was an
increasing medical examination of schoolchildren and, after all,
it isntt so long since there were hardly any schoolchildren because
there were hardly any schools. This has been a tremendous
development that I dontt take time to speak of this morning but
there has been, over this period, an increasing medical examination
of schoolchildren and a dental health service,
In 1962/ 63 the last financial year, there was an
extensive procurement ol vaccine against what? Very interesting
to recall the diseases that were being attacked. Against
tetanus, against whooping-cough, which in some of our countries
is regarded sometimes as a sort of juvenile eccentricity, regarded
with indifference by husbands and causing immense trouble for
wives, but still, whooping cough in a country not so well developed
can be a dread disease, and it was attacked. . Diphtheria,
poliomyelitis, smallpox, cholera, T. B all these things being
attacked by the procurement and use of vaccines with tremendous
personal work being done by regular health patrols and, of course,
by the improvement of nutrition,
I said then " by regular health patrols". If you look
at the relief map out in the foyer outside, somewhat exaggerated
0 00 60 00/

-4-
no dou'st for purposes of demonstration, you will realise that
this is, in many respects a tremendously mountainous country
with here and there a roe d, with here and there a track, but f'or
the most part presenting the most tremendous difficulties of
access, Therefore, perhaps, cmabling more and more small
communities in small valleys or in remote corners to be suffering
from some disease, to be almost extinguishing themselves without
access from the people who might be able to help them. And if
anybody ought to go down in history here with immense fame, it
is the people who have gone out on patrol, who have put up with
all these hardships, who have reached these inaccessible places
in order to bring medical health and apply medical resources to
the needs of the country. That goes indeed in Papua and New
Guinea for almost all the activities of administration, We are
living in an age in which, to bring the ordinary instruments of
peace and progress and benefit to people, requires immaense
personal courage on the part of hundreds and hundreds of young
men out on the trail.
Now, Sir, I hesitate to speak about money because
I find that sums of money that I think are quite big are regarded
by my opponents as trivial. But I think that I should say that
health services as you all know, are costly. Indeed, it is
because you realise that that you have these regular meetings in
order to produce more and more efficacy in the treatment of
disease, because the more efficient, then the more justified is
the expenditure of money. Now, since 1953, that's ten years ago,
the health services in these countries have cost us œ C33M. I had
forgotten to add up the figures. All I remembered in a hazy way
was that my colleague and friend, Mr. Hasluck who is the Minister
for Territories in my Government has a very Leguiling way of
getting more money for the Territories than the rest of us at
first thought proper and, looking back on it, there it is œ P33M.
In the last financial year which closed only the other day,
on health services that amounts to 501-per head of the population,
and to all that you must add in these Territories, the
immense work, the devoted skilled work of mission medical workers,
. So that you will see, just at a glance, that what
has been done here has really been done generously, enthusiastically,
and of course, when I say that, I am the first one to realise that
what looks like a big figure this year will look like a fairly
small and comfortable one before we are another five years older,
If you add together the work of the Administration
here and the work of the missions and this is the last fact
I want to put before you if you add those two together, and
you have in mind that after this last war there were two hospitals
loft standing a mere handful of medical people immediately
available, and then listen when I tell you that in June of this
year there were 100 Government hospitals 100 and a very large
number which I don't have by me of mission hospitals, there were
5' 28 maternity and child welfare centres, there were 1 693 aid
posts or medical centres 1,693 there were 148 doc~ ors and
there were 41., 400 other medical personnel all this on June
1963 and you will see that you have come here representing all
your talent, devotion, experience to a country which affords a
splendid example of an Administration with the co-operation of
the people, going forward along the lines that you have been so
much concerned with, bringing to the people a new chance of
prolonged life, higher medical standards, better living, a better
future, taking them out of the primitive and superstitious a 0 0 0

5
darkness before the medical era and giving them the benefit
of the best that the world can provide. This in other
words, is a great experimental area in the world and I am
delighted that you should have come here in order to bring
your minds together on a disease well known in these
Territories so that the sum of knowledge may be added to,
so that the enthusiasm of those on the spot here will be
refreshed, so that our determination to go forward may be
made stronger and it is in that spirit and having in mind
all these things that I welcome you on behalf of the Government
of Australia and I have pleasure in declaring your Conference
open. I

Transcript 801

OPENING OF THE KEITH MURRAY BUILDING, LINCOIN COLLEGE UNIVERSITY OF ADELAIDE ON 1ST SEPTEMBER, 1963

Photo of Menzies, Robert

Menzies, Robert

Period of Service: 19/12/1949 to 26/01/1966

More information about Menzies, Robert on The National Archive website.

Release Date: 01/09/1963

Release Type: Speech

Transcript ID: 800

OPENING OF THE KEITH MURRAY BUILDING, LINCOLN COLLEGE
UNIVERSITY OF ADELAIDE
ON 1ST SEPTEMBER, 1963
Speech by the Prime Ministerj the Rt. Hon. Sir Robert Menzies
Mr. President, Mr. Premier, Mr. Vice-Chancellor and Ladies and
Gentlemen The Vice-Chancellor is by way of bei. ng a friend of
mine and therefore does me proud, as you might say, but I regret
to tell you that he has omitted some of my academic qualifications
which really entitle me to be here. He has entirely overlooked
the fact that, causa honoris, if for no other reason, I am a
surgeon, a physician, a gynaecologist and obstetrician ( Laughter),
an architect oh, and I forget. And those no doubt give me
spurious qualification for being here, but I don't mind telling
you that my reason for being here, coming over this morning and
going back first thing tomorrow, has a great deal to do not only
with you but with Sir Keith Murray.
This is the Keith Murray Building and I have been
invited I notice with groat interest to name it. Not to open
it or anything of that kind, but to name it, Yesterday afternoon
at the University of Melbourne I found that my task in relation
to the new physiological research building was not to open it but
to dedicate it. Now Sir, this is a task entirely beyond io,
I would have to require it to be performed by others more
ecclesiastically eminent than I am. However, I did it. ( Laughter)
As I told them I remembered that it is only a few years ago that,
speaking at a luncheon of the Presbyterian General Assembly in
Melbourne7 I was introduced by an enthusiastic Moderator-General
as the " Right Reverend R. G. Menzies." ( Laughter) And some of this
aura has no doubt hung about me, so I dedicated a laboratory full
of sheep yesterday and now I am opening a new wing of a college
occupied not by sheep but by..... well, who knows? ( Laughter)
The connection between Sir Keith Murray and yourselves
is a very real one. After all, he was, at the time this College
was established, the head of Lincoln College at Oxford and that
in itself is a very considerable title of honour when you consider
that John Wesley was a Fellow of Lincoln College at Oxford and
remember with pride, as you should, be you Presbyterian like me
or Methodist like Norman Makin that John Wesley was one of the
very great men in the eighteenth century, a century not barren
of great men, not barren of significant people in our history.
Through all its masterly precision, its slight artificiality, its
beautiful craftsmanship, its lovely architecture, there came the
sort of warm pulse of John Wesley, always to be remembered, one
of the immortals of English history. That, I think would be
agreed by everybody. Well here he was, a Fellow of Lincoln.
Keith Murray, the hood of Lincoln.
Back in 1951 1950 or 1951, I've forgotten which
we had I being tremendously keen on university development,
established a sort of ad hoc cormittee to have a look at the
funds and see what needed to be done, and out of this emerged a
grant, a modest enough grant as one sees it now, of about LIM
a year towards the State universities. The very first question
that arose with that co-mittee at quite a late stage in its
deliberations was whether the university colleges, the affiliated
colleges largely church foundations, should in any way at all be
the beneliciaries of any grant that we made, and the cormittee at
that time wasn't very enthusiastic about it. I, myself7 the
most mild-mannered of men, the least qualified to be a dictator,

-2-
spoke to them with a somewhat dictatorial voice and said that
if they believed that a university could reach its full stature
without its affiliated colleges, they were in bitter disagreement
with myself and I would pay little attention to their
report. And in the result there was a small matter I have
forgotten, œ 20,000 or œ 30,000 out of the particular grant
recommended that went, on some basis or other, to the residential
colleges. That was a beginning.
Then, of course, the next stroke was this other
illuminating idea which came to my mind. I have had very few
bright ideas in my life and therefore I can remember them all
without any difficulty. But it occurred to me that what was
needed was not just a sort of catchpenny idea of making a little
grant something to keep the wolf from the door, but what was
needed was a complete and basic examination of the university
problem. This became all the more important because, let
us all remember, that whereas universities before the war might
have, even in the case of the largest of them, 3,000 or 4,000
students, after the war? the demand for tertiary education grew,
not only at an arithmetical progression, but at a geometrical
progression so that instead of having an estimated demand of
20,000 it suddenly appeared to be 30 000 or 35,000. Instead
of 35,600 itsuddenly appeared to be 5,000. And of course,
it was quite manifest that this presented financial problems
utterly beyond the scope of the State Parliaments and Governments,
that the Commonwealth must cone to this party and come to it
in a big way, and if we wore to do that, then we must have some
examination made by a competent body which would not only nap
out the probable future of the universitius, but also ostinate
their future requirements and try to envisage the ways and
means of their development and what would happen to them and
what faculties would expand more than others.
As the first thing you do after you have had a
bright idea is to find a man or men, that's the greatest
problem in life. Somebody suggested to no, " Well, what about
trying to get Sir K-ith Murray. You are going to England this
year. Why not get him? Ho's the Chairman of the Universities
Grants CoLnission and vastly experienced." So I saw him and
he was quite enthusiastic about this. He was to be the Chairnan.
As you know, we ultimately developed a very strong comi: ittoe
about hin. He said to me, " Well, I would like to do this.
It will take sorao months, of course, and I don't know whether
my Minister would let n'o go." So I said, " Who is your Minister?"
" Well," he said, " the Chancellor of the Exchequer", The
Universities Grants Commission in Australia is rosponsible to
me, but in England the Grants Connmission is responsible to the
Chancellor of the Exchequer which is a very different thing.
So I said at that time " Well of course, that's Harold
Macmillan". " Yes." So I went to Harold Macmillan and with
groat goodwill, he said, " Yes, you may have him." So he came
out, and as you remember, many of you, ho nade, with his
Committee, a long investigation.
He understood perfectly the kind of thing that
I had in my own mind about the affiliated colleges, with the
results that have been spoken of here today. He made an
examination which I believe will remain a classic in the history
of Australian education, so long as Australia exists. It was
a masterly report, and being a mastorly report, it overwhelmed
mo and I, in turn, by giving Cabinet singularly little notice,
overwhelmod the Cabinet. oo** o

-3-
So all the recommendations were adopted and
since then, as you know, with the Universities Commission, the
position has gone from strength to strength, never so strong
as you would desire, never I hope will it be so good as you
would desire because that would be the end of the road if the
universities of Australia said, " Well, we have all we need,
thank you. We have no fresh worlds to conquer." You always
will, but at the same time I say, and you will agree, that
the position of the Australian universities of today has been,
in a very real sense, revolutionised over the last ten years.
As I am here speaking at a college within the
University of Adelaide, I may tell you, though I hope nobody
will allow this to be known across the border, that Koith
Murray after making all his investigations was having a long
talk with me just before he made his report and I said, " Well,
which university in Australia strikes you as coming closest
to your idea of a university," and he said, " Beyond question,
Adelaide." Now I am not just telling you that for fun.
This is what he said to me. He did.' t mean by that, that in
Adelaide you had the best grounds because you don't, or the
greatest supply of buildings because this doesn't follow, or
that the affiliated colleges live in handsome lawns and on
ancient walls and gardens. No, he didntt mean that at all.
What he meant was that there was a spirit here at the University
that appealed to him. There was an understanding of what a
university was for and, above all, that there was a feeling
down North Terrace and through the city among men of affairs
and men of business that they did have some interest in the
University, that they felt for it that they wanted it to
succeed, that they were prepared lo contribute some of their
own time and talent and effort to its work. In other words,
that there was a community aspect surrounding the Adelaide
University which appealed to him enormously.
Now having tediously recited to you some of his
history but I think it is necessary to do that because this,
after all, is to be the Keith Murray Wing and he is a groat
and good man I'd just like to conclude by saying something to
you about the colleges themselves.
I know that our forefathers, grandfathers, whoever
they might be according to our ago, struck a great blow for
what they were prepared to call free, secular and compulsory
education. Secular..... and, of course if you are going
to have compulsory education and I am sure that, by and large
that has been a wondorful thing for Australia; I daresay that
it is very hard to get away from the fact that it will be in its
nature secular because we are a mixed society, but I have never
been able to believe that that is where we ought to stop.
I have never boon able to believe that we ought to regard the
cultivation of the mind as something entirely detached from
the cultivation of the spirit. It is, in my opinion, a disaster
when education in any country comes to be almost rigidly separated
from religious faith or religious teaching or religious background,
because it becomes a one-sided thing.
And, therefore, I have throughout these modern
developments wanted to see as much done as possible for those
affiliated colleges which in particular are colleges affiliated
with the Churches of Australia because I think that here, in
this college, for example, there may meet together and fuse
ultimately the feelings of pure intellectualism and the feelings
of pure religious learning and faith. Those two things, by
fusing, will produce bigger and better people, better citizens,
00 0a/ 4

more useful people, people who will increase the existing
minority of people who think first of their duties and only
second of their rights.
And therefore, Sir, I am a tremendous supporter
of the residential colleges. I was delighted when only ten
years ago, eleven years this College was established.
Not an easy matter, not a cheap matter, a matter which will
continue to put big burdens on your community and, of course,
increasing burdens upon the Governments Federal and State who
are contributors to those matters, but that it is worthwhile
I have no doubt whatever. When I say all that I hope that
nobody will suppose I am denouncing State education. I am
not. I am its beneficiary. In a country State school and in
a bigger town State school and on State scholarships and
what-have-you, I know something about what the State provides
and I have been its beneficiary, but I have also grown up
more and more to believe in the significance of these places
of residence which have the characteristics to which I have
referred and I know how much you agree with me and how many
people there are here this afternoon who have put their ninds
and hearts into this enterprise.
Therefore, Sir, I have singular pleasure in
doing what I have been instructed on the paper to do I name
this the Keith Murray Building. I can't declare it open
because it bears every sign of having been opened for some
time.

Transcript 800

WEEK ENDING AUGUST 31, 196 - INDEX OF MINISTERIAL STATEMENTS ISSUED IN CANBERRA

Photo of Menzies, Robert

Menzies, Robert

Period of Service: 19/12/1949 to 26/01/1966

More information about Menzies, Robert on The National Archive website.

Release Date: 31/08/1963

Release Type: Index

Transcript ID: 799

WEEKLY INDEX No.
WEEK ENDING AUGUST 31, 196
COMMONWELLTH OF AUSTRALIA
Index of Ministerial Statements Issued in Canberra
The Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Trade, The Rt. Hon.
John McEwen
Aug. 27No. 826 EXPORT AWARD PROGRAMME ANNOUNCED
The Minister for National Development, Senator the Hon, Sir
William Spooner, K. C. M. G.
Aug. 26 No. 824
29 No. 838
25 No. 823 NEW CAMERA WILL AID QUEST FOR RESOURCES
COMMENT ON OIL FLOW AT RICHMOND No1l AT ROMA
SEATO MILITARY PLANNING OFFICE BANGKOK
The Minister for Territories, The Hon. Paul Hasluck
Aug. 27 No. 827IMMIGRATION POLICY
The Postmaster-General's Department, The Hon. C. W. Davidson
Aug. 27 No. 828
27 No. 829
28 No. 833 TELEPHONE SERVICE WITH THAILAND
POST OFFICE FOR CANBERRA PHILATELIC
EXHIBITION
SITES FOR NATIONAL TELEVISION STATIONS IN
CENTRAL AGRICULTURAL AREA AND SOUTHERN
AGRICULTURAL AREA OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA
The Minister for External Affairs, The Hon. Sir Garfield
Barwick.
Aug. 26 No. 824A AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT TO BUILD NEW OFFICE
FOR EMBASSY IN WASHINGTON, D. C. U. S. A.
27 No. 830A VISIT OF THAI PARLIAMENTARY DELEGATION
28 No. 835A COLOMBO PLAN BADGES
29 No. 839A VISIT BY DR. RAUL PREBISCH.
The Minister for Primary Industry, The Hon. C. F. Adermann
Aug. 28No. 831 MORE AUSTRALIAN DAIRY PRODUCE FOR SOUTH
EAST ASIA
The Minister for the Army, The Hon. J. O. Cramer
No. 822
No. 830
No. 841 NEW INSTRUCTOR FOR ARMY AIR SUPPORT UNIT
MILITARY AIDE FOR N. S. W. GOVERNOR
CHANGES IN ARMY APPOINTMENTS
The Minister for Works, The Hon. Gordon Freeth
No. 821MELBOURNE C'WEALTH CENTRE CONTRAUCT
The Minister for the Navy, Senator the Hon. J. G. Gorton
Aug. 25No. 820STUDY FOR SAILORS
The Minister for Supply, The Hon. Allen Fairhall
Aug. 29No. 839 œ 400,000 BLANKETS ORDER INCLUDES FIRE
DAMAGED WVOOLLEN MILLS.
The Minister for Reptriation. The Hon. R. W. C. Svartz
Aug. 29 No. 836
29 No. 837
30 No. 840 CANCELLED
REPATRIATION MINISTER TO ADDRESS R. S. L.
RfTi ' 1ION DEPARTMENT TO SPONSOR
ARTIFICIAL LIMBS CONFERENCE. / 2
Aug. it
Aug. 26

-2-
The Minister for Repatriation The Hen. R. W. C. Swartz. ( Cond)
No,, 44 REPA'ThTIATION MINISTER OPENS A. C. T.
RETUKNED SE. 1' VICEf. I'EN'S LEAGUE ANN\ UAL
CONGRESS.
30 No. 845 WORKT OF LEGCY PRAISED BY REPATTI1d. TION
MINI STER
The Minister for Air, The Hon. David Fairbnirn
Aug. 28 28 No. 832 1UAA'IF ON THE ATTACK IN EXERCISE CARBINE
No. 834 HERCULES TRANSPORTS BUSY AT WEE,-END.
The Department of Primary Industry
No. 843 EXPORT SUGAIR REBATE
The Department cf the Navy
Aug. 26 No. 825 EXERCISE " CARDBINE" COMMUNIQUE
28 No. 835 EXERCISE " CA', RBINE" COIMUITIQUE
No. 842CANCELLED
With the Compliments of
The Government Public Relations Office,
Parliament House,
CAYBERIUA, A. C. T.
Aug. 30
Aug. 30

Transcript 799

Pages