PM Transcripts

Transcripts from the Prime Ministers of Australia

Hawke, Robert

RECEPTION FOR THE CHINESE NATIONAL PEOPLE'S CONGRESS CANBERRA - 6 MAY 1986

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Hawke, Robert

Period of Service: 11/03/1996 to 03/12/2007

More information about Hawke, Robert on The National Archive website.

Release Date: 06/05/1986

Release Type: Speech

Transcript ID: 10553

EMBARGOED UNTIL DELIVERY CHECK AGAINST DELIVERY
RECEPTION FOR THE CHINESE NATIONAL PEOPLES' CONGRESS
CANBERRA 6 MAY 1986
Mr Peng Chong, and distinguished members of the delegation
of the National Peoples' Congress of the Peoples' Republic
of China.
It gives me great pleasure to welcome you to Australia on
behalf of the Government and people of Australia.
Senator McClelland led an Australian Parliamentary
delegation to China last year and was received by your
National Peoples' Congress with the traditional hospitality
for which the Chinese people are famous. I hope our
hospitality will reciprocate in some part the kindness and
generosity you showed the Australian delegation in China.
Distinguished guests, Australia places considerable
importance on the development of mutual beneficial relations
with China. This view is not only shared by my government
but by all major political parties of Australia, as I am
sure my colleague the Leader of the Opposition will agree.
Australia and China have made remarkable progress in the
development of constructive friendly relations since 1972.
I am pleased this progress has been accelerated under my
Government in the past three years.
When Premier Zhao visited Australia in April 1983 we began a
new phase of co-operation. Premier Zhao and I agreed during
my visit to China in February 1984 that we should work
together to make the Australia/ China relationship a model
for co-operative relations between countries of different
political and economic systems.
We have developed the concept of sectoral initiatives and
the China Action Plan, both of which are designed to promote
greater economic co-operation which takes advantage of the
economic strength and requirements for growth in each
country. Premier Zhao and I were able to agree in 1984 on the first
of the sectoral initiatives, in Iron and Steel. We are
continuing to develop this initiative as well as extending
the concept to other important fields. These include
non-ferrous metals, transport and woollen products.

At the same time we have not concentrated only on our
economic relations. Both countries believe this
relationship of genuine friendship and co-operation should
be as broadly-based as possible. Apart from trade and
commercial relations, we regard cultural, scientific,
technological and sporting exchanges as essential elements
of the relationship.
Moreover, over the past few years we have developed a most
productive dialogue on a wide range of regional and
international issues of importance to both countries.
The visit to Australia of General-Secretary Hu Yaobang in
April 1985 was a high point in recent exchanges between our
countries. I myself am looking forward to my visit to China in just
under two weeks time, when I will be able to renew my valued
friendships with senior Chinese leaders. I also look
forward to seeing more of the diversity and achievements of
China when I visit a number of important centres outside
Beijing, including Chengdu [ Cheng-doo], Nanjing [ Nan-jing]
and Xiamen [ See-ar-men].
Parliamentary exchanges are a most important element in
developing people-to-people contacts between our two
countries. For this reason your visit is particularly
welcome and I wish you a most successful, interesting and
pleasant visit to Australia.

Transcript 10553

FOR MEDIA JOINT STATEMENT BY PRIME MINISTER AND PEMIER OF NEW SOUTH WALES

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Hawke, Robert

Period of Service: 11/03/1996 to 03/12/2007

More information about Hawke, Robert on The National Archive website.

Release Date: 21/02/1985

Release Type: Media Release

Transcript ID: 10552

_ A
PRIME MIMSTER
FOR MEDIA 21 February 1985
JOINT'STATEMENT BY PRIME MINISTER AND PREMIER OF NEW SOUTH WALES
The Prime Minister, Mr Hawke, and the New South Walee-Premier.
Mr Wran, today welcomed the call by the Federal Executive of the
Australian Medical Association for doctors in New South Wales
public hospitals to resume normal duties.
The call came following the agreement reached in negotiations
involving the Prime Minister, the Federal Health Minister,
Dr Blewett, and New South Wales Deputy Premier and Minister for
Health, Mr Mulock in Canberra today.
The Prime Minister and Premier said the agreement formed the
basis for settlement of the long-running dispute.
" We urge NSW surgeons to respond positively to the responsi! K! e
and reasonable recommendation made by Mr Thompson,' they said.
" We have always believed that the gcod sense of the majority of
the profession would prevail over the political objectives of
extremist groups."
" The AMA's statement today reflects the belief of most doctors
that the well-being of their patients is of paramount
importance." " Following this call for a return to work we are confident that
immediate negotiations between both Governments and the AM4A can
address the legitimate concerns of the profession."
' Through these negotiations the previous high standard of
patient care can be restored in New South Wales public
hospitals. We are determined that every Aust%_-ralian' s right of
health cover through the fair and universal Medicare program
will be maintained."
As a result of discussions today w. ith the AMA the following
agreement has been reached between the parties:
The AMA accepts the Prime Minister's and Premier ' s offer of
23 Janaury ( as amended by not insisting on withdrawal of
resignations);

2.
The AMA agrees to an extensive advertising and
communication program calling upon doctors to resitme
normal duties;
The Governments agree to begin negotiations with the AMA
next Tuesday with a preliminary meeting between officers
on Saturday to determine procedures and timetable;
The Governments agree to defer the advertising cf specific
vacancies pending an assessment to be made next week of the
extent to which doctors make themselves available for
normal duties; if there are gaps remaining in the
provision of medical services in public hospitals then
specific positions will be advertised.

Transcript 10552

NATIONAL CONSULTATION AND ASSISTANCE PROGRAM FOR WOMEN

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Hawke, Robert

Period of Service: 11/03/1996 to 03/12/2007

More information about Hawke, Robert on The National Archive website.

Release Date: 08/11/1984

Release Type: Media Release

Transcript ID: 10551

to
8 November 1984
FOR MEDIA
NATIONAL CONSULTATION AND ASSISTANCE PROGRAM FOR WOMEN
I am happy to announce today a National Consultation and
Assistance Program for women totalling $ 472,000.
The first part of the Program will provide an annual
increase of $ 122,000 in funds for grants to national women's
organisations. These grants will be administered by the
office of the Status of Women in my Department.
The second part of the Program is designed to assist member
organisations of the National Women's Consultative Council.
These comprise a wide range of national women's
organisations and other organisations committed to improving
the status of women. The Government consults the Council
about major issues which affect women.
The Government has approved a special one-off payment of
$ 10,000 for each of the non-government organisations on the
Council. The total allocation will be $ 150,000 over two
years. This will provide Council members with the resources
necessary to seek out the views of their members on issues
identified by the Government and to generally consult their
members on issues of importance to women.
The organisations to benefit from these payments are:
Association of Civilian Widows
Australian C6uncil of Churches
Australian Council of Trade Unions
Australian Federation of Business-and Professional
Women
Australian Federation of University Women
Australian Union of Students
Country Women's Association of Australia
Disabled Peoples International
Federation of Aboriginal Women
Federation of Ethnic Communities' Councils of Australia
National Aboriginal Conference
National Council of Women of Australia
Union of Australian Women
Women's Electoral Lobby

In addition, the Council Convenor, Mrs Edith Hall, will
receive an allocation to assist her with the expenses
associated with running the Council.
The third part of the Program is an annual allocation
totalling $ 200,000 for grants to approved organisations for
projects to assist women.
Organisations will need to submit projects for approval and
in most cases the grant will be limited to $ 15,000.
Eligible organisations could include trade unions, churches,
ethnic or Aboriginal groups as well as the traditional
women's organisations.
The whole Program is designed to increase the input of women
into decisions made for and about them.
My Government is committed to providing women with
opportunities to participate fully in all aspects of
Australian social and economic life. I am particularly
aware of the widespread interest expressed by women's
organisations in taxation matters. I have informed the
Council that at least one of its members will attend the
Taxation Summit specifically to represent women's interests.

Transcript 10551

OPPOSITION'S CONSUMPTION TAX PACKAGE

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Hawke, Robert

Period of Service: 11/03/1983 to 20/12/1991

More information about Hawke, Robert on The National Archive website.

Release Date: 25/11/1991

Release Type: Media Release

Transcript ID: 8357

FOR MEDIA 25 NOVEMBER 1991
Dr Hewson's consumption tax package raises a fundamental
question: is Dr Hewson serious about microeconomic reform
and achieving the fundamental changes he claims are so vital
for the Australian economy? If so why has he made no
allowance for road user charges in his calculations and
policy design?


Dr Hewson's package attempts to paint a picture of a new,
dynamic Australia where business has been freed from
supposed constraints and operates in a revamped environment
that promotes a vastly enhanced level of efficiency.
In Table 4.1 on page 33 of the summary document, Dr Hewrson
enthusiastically embraces the estimated benefits from
microeconomic reform prepared by the Industry Commission
( IC) and others. Here, and elsewhere, much is made of the
benefits from reform of transport. Indeed Dr Hewson becomes
quite lyrical about the importance of an efficient transport
system to Australia.


" If Australia is to compete effectively on world
markets it must not only deal sensibly with the
" tyranny of distance" between us and our overseas
markets. It must also deal sensibly with our very own
domestic " tyranny of distance". ( Supplementary
Paper 8, p. 1)


Dr Hewson's commitment is also quite specific and detailed:
" The incoming Coalition Government, therefore, will
request the newly established National Road Transport
Commission to review a national system of road user
charges to apply following the implementation of our
tax reform package. The Commission would be guided by
the need for the system of road user charges to be
equitable, efficient and simple to administer. The
Commission would be free to recommend that charges take
any form or combination of forms.
3242 A
A494W

These changes to the arrangements for road funding will
ensure that all revenue raised by user charges will be
spent on road maintenance and construction. The
overall level of road user charges and road
expenditures will be the responsibility of the National
Road Transport Commission. Charges and taxes on road
users and the level of expenditure on roads will no
longer be subject to the vagaries of the political or
budget processes which have produced wild fluctuations
in rates of charge and levels of expenditure in past
years." ( Main document, pp. 82-3)
The package specifically recognises the revenue implications
of the introduction of road user charges:
" The funding of road expenditure by road user charges
has the potential to improve the budgetary position of
the Commonwealth and to this extent the fully funded
proposal contained in this package is very
conservative." ( Supplementary Paper 8,
In fact the revenue raised under the system proposed in the
report on road user charges by the InterState Commission
( ISC) would be about $ 4 billion.
But when it comes to reccgnising that the imposition of
these charges has implications for the price of fuel, Dr
Hewson's document is strangely silent. Page 82 of the main
document contains the inaccurate excuse:
" At the present time the Federal Government and the
States are in this process of negotiating a new
approach to road funding. These negotiations are
however hampered by the Commonwealth reliance on fuel
excises as a source of general revenue and by the
increased reliance of the States on fuel-related
franchise fees as a milch cow for general revenue.
At the time of developing this proposal the final
nature and design of the new arrangements is unknown.
The Coalition therefore is not now in a position to
assess the adequacy or otherwise of the new road user
charges that are expected to be implemented next year
or beyond." 3243

3.
In f act a great deal of work has been done and pb2LJ~ C,
released by the ISC ( two reports) and the Premiers'
Conference Over-arching Group on Land Transport ( CAG). On
the basis of this work the Commonwealth and the States have
concluded an agreement covering the introduction of road
user charges for heavy vehicles and legislation-gñ izinn
Affect-to thin gareemnt wan Intoud in he erZ QflU
NnvpImb2Z. The details of this agreement, going to
mechanisms for setting and collecting these charges and to
their likely magnitude, were annoinnnd in the rnm~ imnique
from the Jtuly Rpecial PeMiersI Cofrnn and quifloti ng
documpntation. The details run to a number of pages but a
key paragraph demonstrates that road user charges on fuel
would be absorbed into the existing excise and not levied as
an extra charge:
" Registration charges and the road use charge component
of Commonwealth excise on diesel are to be adjusted in
future by the National Road Transport Commission in
line with the amount of national road system costs
attributable to heavy vehicles. Accordingly, State
fuel franchise fees and the taxation component of
Commonwealth diesel excise are to be separately
identified and adjusted in future by separate
mechanisms." ( July communique,
Dr Hewson chose to ignore this wealth of material that could
have provided an entirely satisfactory basis for factoring
road user charges into his calculations.
Why? Could it be that the conclusions of such an analysiLs are
unpalatable and unacceptable to the National Party?
The impact on his calculations and claims are certainly
dramatic and far reaching. Let me illustrate.
The work by the ISC and the OAG, referred to earlier,
concludes that an element relating purely to distance
travelled is essential in any system of road user charges
and that the only effective and efficient way to achieve
this is through a charge on fuel. Their work suggested that
a charge of around 16c a litre would be required on both
diesel and petrol.
With such charges in place, Dr Hewson's maximum scope for
reduction of the then remaining petrol and diesel excises is
9.8c a litre. This would be the maximum fall in fuel prices
he could offer business users. Private motorists are
subject to the 15 per cent consumption tax, estimated at 7c
a litre in Dr Hewson's document, and, therefore, would see
falls of no more than 2-3c a litre.
32414

4.
The savings for the average family that Dr iHewson makes so
much of would be reduced from $ 11.40 for a 60 litre tank of
petrol to $ 1.20-1.80, a dramatically different story the
sort of savings that can be made in periods of petrol price
discounting. The savings in business costs flowing from reductions in
fuel prices that he refers to repeatedly throughout the
document would be cut by about two thirds.
Dr Hewson's CPI calculation would require significant
correction. The removal of 16c from the proposed reduction
of 25.8c in the excise on a litre of fuel cuts the 1.3
percentage point price level reduction from this source
( reported in Table 8.1 on page~ 134 of the main document) to
percentage points. Hence, on Dr Hewson's own figures,
the impact of the package on the CPI is not an increase of
4.7 per cent but an increase of 5.5 per cent, with obvious
implications for the adequacy of the so-called compensation
package. Will Dr Hewson fall at the first hurdle of microeconomic
reform because of the National Party veto?
Which do we take seriously, Or Hewson's vision for a more
efficient Australia based on a Government prepared to take
tough decisions or the calculations and assertions about the
impact of the package in Dr Hewson's " carefully prepared"
document? 3245

Transcript 8357

SPEECH AT THE OPENING OF THE TELECOM AUSTRALIA THEATRE AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL CANBERRA

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Hawke, Robert

Period of Service: 11/03/1983 to 20/12/1991

More information about Hawke, Robert on The National Archive website.

Release Date: 11/11/1991

Release Type: Speech

Transcript ID: 8352

lW~ fl AtnATN~ q1 ThT. T7' PV PMRARM~ En UINTIL. DELIVFRY
SPEECH BY THE PRIME MINISTER
OPENING OF THE TELECOM AUSTRALIA THEATRE
AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL
CANBERRA 11 NOVEMBER 1991
Dame Beryl Beaurepaire,
Ben Humphreys
Brendon Kelson, Director of Australian War Memorial
Mel Ward, Managing Director Telecom
Your Excellencies
Distinguished Guests
Ladies and Gentlemen
The Australian War Memorial is a unique institution not just
in this country, but in the world.
It is not simply a museum, though it is a museum. It is not
simply a memorial, though it is a memorial. It is not a
tomb, though all the Australians who died in war are present;
here. The Australian War Memorial contains all those things
museum, memorial and mausoleum and more. It is, to quote
John Curtin at the opening of this extraordinary building
fifty years ago today, " the sanctuary of Australian
traditions." A sanctuary where C W Bean the father of the Memorial said
we should " feel the presence of the dead", where we would
find their " relics and records" close by, and where we would.
find understanding through knowledge. In Bean's inspired
view this was the most profound way to commemoration and
remembrance. I
Their spirit would be here, because unlike most other
countries we know their names. -Although Australia returned
just one body home in World War One, we had no need for a
tomb of the unknown soldier, for we know who they were and
we remember them.
Bean read the words of an Australian soldier, dying alone in
a muddy hole in France in the First World War and kept them
as motivation through the long years it took to establish
this great shrine. The soldier wrote, " At least in
Australia they will remember me."

On this Remembrance Day, at this opening of a new page in
the story of' the Australian War Memorial, it is fitting that
we should remember what those Australian traditions are,
what the Australians whose names are fixed forever in bronze
died for: liberty, democracy, the rule of law, national
sovereignty and peace.
In 1991 those traditions, which are not so uniquely
Australian that we have not wanted to share them, are as
important as they ever were.
We have seen over the past two years that those traditions
are what people all over the world demand as well in
Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, in Africa, Asia
and South America.
This year, Australians have again served with distinction in
war, to defeat aggression in the Gulf.
Australians are still serving overseas, under the United
Nations in the Western Sahara.
Before this year ends, Australians will be serving in
Cambodia, under the United Nations, to underwrite a peace
settlement which Australian diplomacy has been instrumental
in achieving..
No one can overlook the poignancy of the opening of the of
this Memorial fifty years ago, on the eve of that massive
struggle in t~ he Pacific which did so much to shape Australia
and its regio~ n.
The Pacific War was the greatest crisis in our nation's
history, and we emerged from it much changed. In its way it
was a rite of passage as fundamental as Gallipoli.
For if Gallipoli gave Australians a sense of our identity as
a nation, the Pacific War brought us to understand our
location as a. nation, and our destiny as a part of the Asia-
Pacific region.
It marked the decisive turning point of the colonial era in
Asia, and the emergence of the complex community of
independent nations which are today our neighbours and
friends. It also marked the final chapter of our own colonial era,
and the foundati6n of our unique partnership with the United
States a distinctively Pacific relationship which has
grown to reflect our increasing acceptance of the Asia-
Pacific region as the place where we live.
It is fitting that today's ceremonies are the first of a
series on which, over the next year, Australians will look
back with that vividness which an anniversary brings to the
events of fif-ty years ago.

There will be a series of special events to mark particular,
dates; the fall of Singapore, the bombing of Darwin, the
Battle of the Coral Sea, and the Kokoda Trail. The
Government wrill participate fully in these events.
I plan to be! in Darwin in February to commemorate the first
bombing raid.; in the Coral Sea in May to commemorate the
great naval battle which laid the foundations for allied
control of the Pacific Ocean; and on the Kokoda Trail later
in the year to remember those great battles in which
Australians turned the tide of the Japanese march.
In marking these anniversaries, we will be recalling not
only the sacrifi ces made by Australians in defence of their
country, but also the sacrifices of our allies, particularly
the United States. Each year the anniversary of the Coral
Sea has been an occasion for the US and Australia to
remember the fire in which our alliance was forged.
This year it will be a special opportunity to look back on
fifty years of co-operation and partnership, and look
forward to the continued growth and evolution of this
relationship over the challenging years ahead.
With this in mind a Coral Sea Commemorative Council has been
established under the chairmanship of Sir Eric Neal,
bringing tog-ether many eminent Australians to co-ordinate
and develop commemorative activities. The Council aims not
only to remind Australians and Americans of the momentous
events of fifty years ago, but also to encourage them to
look to the future of that relationship in the twenty-first
century. I am honoured to be Patron, with my friend the
American Ambassador Mel Sembler and I give the Committee my
full support.
Over the coming year we will also be remembering the
sacrifices o: E other allies in the defence of Australia. I
would mention in, particular the Dutch forces which fought
here. The government has recently agreed to contribute to
the erection of a memorial in Canberra to those forces.
And in these commemorations we will also remember the
Japanese, for7 whom the Pacific war was such an appalling
tragedy, and such an important rebirth. We will remember
not just the Pacific war a war often of great ferocity and
cruelty but also the regeneration of Japan after the war
and its extraordinary development as an economic power and
partner for Australia, and also, increasingly, as a valued
political partner in regional afid international affairs.
As we move, ever more rapidly it seems, towards the twenty
first century it is right that we should remember how far we
have come in this great country, who made the ultimate
sacrifice that has permitted us our achievements, and
reflect for et moment on where we are going.

Nothing is more constant than change: that was true fifty
years ago, when John Curtin spoke here, and it is true
today. Curtin had to look to a re-orientation in Australia's
foreign policy, to putting the economy on a war footing.
Fifty years on we have look at those things again.
The Australian War Memorial has also had to face the squalls
of change, right from the day it was opened. Conceived as a
memorial to World War One, this Memorial was of course,
opened in World War Two and necessarily had to incorporate
a second generation of sacrifice.
The story of the way the Memorial has coped or not, with
change over the past fifty years, and with the troubled time
between 1917, when Bean first thought of the Memorial, and
1941 is told in Michael McKernan's fascinating and moving
history, Here Is Their Spirit.
Suffice to say here that an institution which had not
changed with the times would not have been able to
commission and publish such a warts and all work.
The Australian War Memorial of 1991 is quite different to
the one opened in 1941. It has not in any way betrayed the
ideals of Bean it has expanded and enhanced them. Bean
looked for the best way, artistically and technically, to
display the relics and records to their best advantage.
He would, I am sure, be delighted and proud that such a
splendid venue as the Telecom Australia Theatre would be
available for the screening of the Memorial's moving picture
heritage. Especially as Bean had encouraged two photographers, Frank
Hurley and Hubert Wilkins, to try their hand at moving
pictures, an infant artform at that time.
Their work, some of which has been shown during the
Memorial's recent film festival, is a vivid, almost haunting
reminder of the terrible ravages of that war in France and
Gallipoli. John Treloar, Bean's friend and director of the Memorial
from its inception until his death in 1952, commissioned
kilometres of film during World War Two to the extent that
the Memorial collection contains some 4000 titles with about
1000 kilometres of footage.
For many years this magnificent -collection of film material
was available to only a few scholars who were able to use it
in the Research Centre.
Regrettably the great majority of Australians were denied
access to an important part of their heritage.

Through the generous support of Telecom Australia that has
now changed. I congratulate Telecom in joining forces with
the War Memorial in this major project and the Memorial
Council and management for the enterprise shown in arranging
for this important partnership.
I began by saying that the Australian War Memorial is a
unique institution more than a museum, more than a tomb,
more than a gallery, more than a research facility more
than a simple memorial. It is all of those things.
Over the past fifty changing years it has become a place of
pilgrimage until it has nearly one million visitors a year.
While I suppose some of those visitors simply come here
because it is one of the places on the tourist trail in
Canberra, I am sure that none leave here without learning a
little bit more about our Australian history, our collective
memories and our stories about being Australian.
The Telecom Australia Theatre will make a substantial
contribution to this living history.
It now gives me much pleasure to formally declare open the
Telecom Australia Theatre.

Transcript 8352

PARLIAMENTARY STATEMENT BY THE PRIME MINISTER ON HIS VISIT TO ZIMBABWE AND THE 1991 COMMONWEALTH HEADS OF GOVERNMENT MEETING HARARE

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Hawke, Robert

Period of Service: 11/03/1983 to 20/12/1991

More information about Hawke, Robert on The National Archive website.

Release Date: 06/11/1991

Release Type: Statement in Parliament

Transcript ID: 8351

/ 0
PARLIAMENTARY STATEMENT BY THE PRIME MINISTER
ON HIS VISIT TO ZIMBABWE AND THE
1991 COMMONWEALTH HEADS OF GOVERNMENT MT' Q{-AARA
WEDNESDAY, 6 NOVEMBER 1991
Mr Speaker
seek leave to report-to the House on t] I*
visit I made to Zimbabwe between 14 and 24 0 n
My visit had four main components: a meeting of the
High-Level Appraisal Group on the future of the
Commonwealth, the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting
itself, a short bilateral visit to Zimbabwe at the
invitation of President Robert Mugabe, and my separate
bilateral discussions with a number of Heads of Government
of countries important to Australia. In all its elements,
my visit significantly advanced important Australian foreign
and international economic policy interests.
Mr Speaker
The High-Level Appraisal Group on the future of the
Commonwealth was established by the 1989 Commonwealth Heads
of Government in Kuala Lumpur to examine Commonwealth
priorities for the 1990s and beyond, and to consider the
adequacy of Commnonwealth institutions to meet these
priorities. It was the first review of the Commonwealth's
priorities to be undertaken by Heads of Government. Ten
Commonwealth leaders took part, under the chairmanship of
Prime Minister Mahathir of Malaysia. Our meeting, on
October, considered preparatory documents prepared by a
special group of senior officials, and by the Commonwealth
Secretary-General. The main result of our deliberations was
the draft Harare Declaration on the future of the
Commonwealth, which was later endorsed by all Commonwealth
Heads of Government.
My colleagues on the High-Level Appraisal Group agreed that
the Commonwealth should seek to make a distinctive
contribution int particular areas where it has a comparative
advantage and proven expertise, and where its efforts
complement, rather than compete with, larger or more
specialised multilateral agencies.
A particular priority which we identified for the
Commonwealth is; the protection and promotion of the
fundamental pol~ itical values enshrined in the Commonwealth's
Singapore Decla~ ration of 1971. These values include
democracy, democratic processes and institutions, the rule
of law, just and honest government and fundamental human
rights. I

The steady spread of these values around the world has been
one of the most heartening international developments of the
past few years. And I was struck by the degree of
commitment to them which I found among my colleagues in
Harare. But we all recognised that the Commonwealth
countries are not perfect in this regard.
At Harare it was agreed that Commonwealth members should
help one another to do better by developing institutions of
democratic government. We recognised that in these areas
the Commonwealth's unique strengths of a shared heritage and
common language can contribute to a pragmatic and
cooperative approach to solving problems.
We are already seeing that happen. The Commonwealth's role
in election monitoring, guidelines for which were approved
by the High-Level Appraisal Group, is one important area of
assistance. The President of the Senate, Senator Sibraa,
and the Hon Member for MacKellar have been involved in just
such a monitoring exercise in Zambia in the past week.
The peaceful and orderly transfer of power in Zambia over
the weekend is a sign of hope that the democratic principlev
of the Commonwealth will at last take deep root and flourish
in Africa. I have sent messages both to Zambia's new
president Mr Chiluba and to his predecessor, my old
Commonwealth colleague Kenneth Kaunda, congratulating them
on this historic achievement.
Other priorities which we identified for the Commonwealth
include the promotion of sustainable development; further
help to bring about a free, democratic, non-racial and
prosperous South Africa; action to combat drug trafficking
and abuse: and help with the particular economic and
security problems of small Commonwealth states, many of
which are in our own region.
Mr Speaker
The full Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting was held
between 16 and 21 October. Forty-seven countries were
represented, forty-three of them by their Heads of State or
Prime Ministers. President Mugabe of Zimbabwe chaired the
meeting. Issues on the agenda for the meeting included global trends
and prospects, South Africa, the world economic situation,
environmental issues and Commonwealth functional
cooperation. On South Africa, the principal issue facing CHOGM this year
was to determine the Commonwealth's response to the
fundamental process of reform which had been initiated in
South Africa during the two years since Commonwealth Heads
of Government last met.

The major steps which have been taken in South Africa to
dismantle apartheid and commence the work of building a nonracial
constitution were symbolised for us in Harare by the
presence amongst us of Nelson Mandela. Two years ago when
CHOGM met in Kuala Lumpur, Mandela was still a prisoner in a
South African jail.
The change of heart in the South African Government
symbolised by his release, and by the dismantling of the
legislative pillars of apartheid, has been a spectacular
vindication of the principled stance and practical measures
that the Commonwealth, often at Australia's urging, has
adopted on the South Africa issue in recent years.
But equally the massive progress in South Africa is a
challenge to the Commonwealth to move with the times. It
must respond to that progress in an imaginative and forwardlooking
way which will ensure that the Commonwealth
continues to lead international opinion in working for the
well-being of all South Africa's peoples.
This is a challenge which the Commonwealth Heads of
Government took up with alacrity. Even before CHOGM proper,
began, at the High Level Appraisal Group meeting on October
my Commonwealth colleagues showed their determination to
ensure that the Commonwealth remained relevant and
constructive. They were determined in particular to establish a direct and
vigorous dialogue with the principal parties to the reform
process in South Africa, so that the Commonwealth could
learn directly from those involved how it could best
contribute to that process. CHOGM decided to despatch the
Commonwealth Secretary-General, Chief Anyaoku, to South
Africa. This week he will explore with the principal
parties how the Commonwealth might assist in lending
momentum to the process of negotiating a new constitution.
Australia strongly supports this forward-looking step.
The same spirit was evident in the discussions of the future
of Commonwealth sanctions on South Africa. The meeting
recognised the significance which sanctions undoubtedly had
in bringing the South African Government to the negotiating
table. And they recognised that as long as the process of reform
continued to be frustrated and obstructed by acts of bad
faith, sanctions would be important to maintaining the
momentum of negotiations.
But equally they recognised as Nelson Mandela himself said
that sanctions are doing serious damage to South Africa's
economy, and to the welfare of ordinary South Africans. For
that reason, sanctions should not be kept in place any
longer than necessary.

In the light of these considerations, CHOGM decided to adopt
the recommendations of the Commonwealth Committee of Foreign
Ministers on South Africa ( CFMSA) for a phased approach to
the lifting of sanctions. The CFMSA's recommendations
strongly reflected Australia's long-standing views, which
had been vigorously put fcrward by Senator Evans at
successive CFMSA meetings. We were therefore delighted with
this outcome.
In accepting the CFMSA proposals, the CHOGM agreed to the
immediate lifting of people-to-people sanctions, covering
visa and consular matters, cultural and scientific ties, and
air links. We are already implementing these decisions.
Trade and investment sanctions will be lifted once
appropriate transitional mechanisms have been agreed, and
financial sanctions will be lifted when a new constitution
has been agreed. The arms embargo will be lifted only when
a non-racial, democratic government is in place.
I was heartened by the views put to me by Nelson Mandela in
my long and detailed private discussions with him on the
prospects for reform in South Africa and the future of the
Commonwealth's role. Mr Mandela told me he was confident
that the pace of reform would allow rapid lifting of both
trade and investment sanctions and financial sanctions. His
confidence reflected a belief that the South African
Government shared his concern about the effect of the
sanctions on South Africa's economy. It also reflected his
belief that the Government accepts that transitional
arrangements must be finalised quickly, as it recognises
that it cannot continue to be both umpire and player in the
reform process.
The Commonwealth is now looking to the future South Africa.
Its new focus, underscored in Harare, will be to help the
people of South Africa manage the changes now upon them in
ways that will ensure a new non-racial nation re-enters the
international community in the best possible shape.
Australia is helping develop the democratic anti-apartheid
movement's role in the sound economic management of
post-apartheid South Africa. This was cited by a number of
Commonwealth colleagues as a model for the sort of help the
Commonwealth can provide.

Mr Speaker
The Commonwealth meeting unanimously endorsed the proposals
of the CFMSA Ministers on the re-entry of South African
sporting bodies into international competition as long as
they achieve uniLty and are endorsed by the appropriate
non-racial sporting organiisation in South Africa. It was
particularly gratifying that we were able to have included
in the meeting's communique specific reference to the
Commonwealth's support for South African participation in
the cricket World Cup in Australia and New Zealand early
next year, and -that the International Cricket Conference has
since agreed to this.
Mr Speaker
In the discussion of the world economic situation,
Commonwealth leaders demonstrated their firm commitment to
greater trade liberalisation. This diverse group of
countries developed and developing, and from every
continent recognised the perils of a drift towards greater
protectionism. They called for a successful, substantive and comprehensive
outcome to the Uruguay Round, laying particular emphasis on
a marked reductiLon in trade barriers and other distortions
in agricultural markets. I told my colleagues that it would
be tragic if, at the very moment the Cold War has ended and
the world's hopes for peace seem closer to fulfilment than
ever before, we were to undercut our achievement by a
reversion to selfish, but finally self-defeating, forms of
protectionism. I was heartened by the strong support this message received
from my Commonwealth colleagues. Like all Honourable
Members, I hope that in the critical months ahead the
leaders of the major trading nations take careful note of
the message sent to them by one quarter of the world's
population through their leaders in Harare.
Mr Speaker
The Commonwealth leaders also emphasised their continuing
support for the protection of the global environment and the
achievement of sustainable development. They pledged
themselves to work for a successful outcome of the United
Nations Conference on the Environment and Development next
year. I announced my own intention to attend that meeting,
as did many of my colleagues. Commonwealth members will be
cooperating closely in the months ahead to help ensure the
success of this important meeting.

Another issue discussed at the meeting, which I should
mention briefly, was the report of a working party on the
role of sport in the Commonwealth, including the
Commonwealth Games. As Honourable Members will know, both
Adelaide and Kuala Lumpur have applied to hold the 1998
Commonwealth Games. I made clear, in both my formal and
informal contacts with my colleagues, that although
Australia supports the principle of involving as many
countries as possible in the future of the Games, we firmly
believed Adelaide has the best bid for 1998 and that we
would continue to work for its success.
Mr Speaker
In addition to my participation in the formal CHOGM
sessions, I was also able to undertake a range of bilateral
discussions with leaders of a number of countries important
to Australia. Among these were Prime Ministers John Major
of the United Kingdom, Brian Mulroney of Canada, Jim Bolger
of New Zealand, Rabble Namaliu of Papua New Guinea,
Dr Mahathir of Malaysia, Goh Chok Tong of Singapore and Rao
of India. I was also able to hold discussions with
President Vassiliou of Cyprus and Prime Minister
Fenech-Adami of Malta as well as the Heads of Government of
our Pacific Commonwealth neighbours.
My stop-over in Mauritius gave me an opportunity to talk at
length to Mr Madun Dulloo, the Minister of Agriculture,
Fisheries and Natural Resources about our growing economic
relationship with Mauritius, our second largest trading
partner in Africa.
It would not be appropriate for me to canvas the details of
all my bilateral discussions, but there are a couple of
specific points which I should mention.
Prime Minister Rao and I had a particularly useful
discussion of Australia's relations with India and of the
opportunities now opened up by his government's far-reaching
moves to liberalise the Indian economy. He and I agreed
that we should put renewed effort into our existing trade,
economic and broader political exchanges. As he put it to
me, " it is now time to take the initiative and push hard" to
develop our relationship to its full potential. Officials
from both countries will be working actively towards this
goal.

With Dr Mahathir, as has been reported, I had a very
amicable and productive conversation about a range of
economic and political issues, including the tensions which
had entered our bilateral relationship as a result of
Malaysian concerns about some reports and portrayals in the
Australian media. Both of us fully accepted that the role
of the free press in Australia was not at issue; my
Government regarded this as a fundamental feature of our
society and wou: ld not in any circumstances seek to undermine
it. But we also acknowledged that there were times when
inaccurate or distorted reports or portrayals were of such a
kind that it was proper for governments to dissociate
themselves from them, and we each agreed that we would be
prepared to do -this if the circumstances made this
appropriate. We agreed that our relationship was now fully
back to normal.
I had a valuable discussion with President Vassiliou about
the situation in Cyprus. I told him that I was greatly
looking forward to his visit to Australia later in the year.
I was also able to discuss the tragic situation in Sri Lanka
with the Sri Lankan representative in Harare. I have sincei
written to President Premadasa, who was unable to be present
at CHOGM, reaffirming to him my Government's support for a
Commonwealth good offices role in Sri Lanka, if that could
help to bring an end to the violence.
Mr Speaker
My short bilateral visit to Zimbabwe at the invitation of
President Mugabe was a particular pleasure for me. In part,
President Mugabe's invitation was a mark of appreciation for
the role which Australia played in the long and difficult
process of securing Zimbabwe's independence and I pay
tribute here to the part which my predecessor
Mr Malcolm Fraser played in this; for the support we
offered through our peacekeeping forces and election
observers in the transition period; and for our aid and
assistance in the immediate aftermath of independence and
since. I was able to discuss in a long meeting with
President Mugabe a range of regional and international
issues, including his views on the future of southern
Africa, as well. as developments inside Zimbabwe and our
bilateral relationship. I was heartened by the commitment
to multi-party democracy in Zimbabwe which President Mugabe
evinced in our discussions.

With the introduction of the Zimbabwe Government's
Structural Adjustment Program, Zimbabwe offers growing
opportunities for Australian trade and investment. I was
glad to obtain from President Mugabe his assurance that he
would take a personal interest in the negotiations at
present underway . between the Zimbabwe Government and a Delta
Gold BHP consortium for. a proposed platinum mining project
which would represent the largest single foreign investment
in Zimbabwe since independence.
Mr Speaker
It was a privilege for me to be able to see the ways in
which Australian aid, both official and non-official, is
helping Zimbabwe's development.
I visited a World Vision aid project in the UMP district of
Zimbabwe and saw at first hand the changes that this
relatively small project only $ 1.29 million of Australian
aid is bringing through practical improvements in water
supply, health and agriculture to a region where per capita
income is around $ 150 a year.
I was pleased also to be able to hand over to a Harare
Primary School a selection from thirty tonnes of school
books collected in Western Australia for Zimbabwe schools.
Both visits brought home very vividly to me and my staff, to
the accompanying members of the press, and to those
Australians who saw it on television here, just what a
difference modest amounts of aid can make in the daily lives
of people who are struggling to survive.
Australia's aid program will continue, properly, to be
directed primarily towards our own region of the world. But
I do not believe that Australians will ever want to turn our
backs on projects such as that in the UMP district, directed
towards the poorest and most marginalised of the world's
people. My Government will continue to maintain its support for this
project, and for others like it.
Mr Speaker
My visit to Zimbabwe and my attendance at the Commonwealth
Heads of Government Meeting were a reminder that Australia
is an important and well-respected member of an increasingly
inter-related and inter-dependent international community;
and that in such a world, policies of isolationism or narrow
regionalism will never be adequate to secure either this
country's security or its prosperity.

Transcript 8351

CONVENTION FOR A DEMOCRATIC SOUTH AFRICA

Photo of Hawke, Robert

Hawke, Robert

Period of Service: 11/03/1983 to 20/12/1991

More information about Hawke, Robert on The National Archive website.

Release Date: 13/12/1991

Release Type: Media Release

Transcript ID: 8366

0
PRIME MINISTER
FOR MEDIA 13 December 1991
I warmly welcome the announcement that the Convention for
a Democratic South Africa ( CODESA) will be held on 20-21
December in Johannesburg. CODESA will be the forum for
negotiation of a new constitution for South Africa and
over twenty South African political groups have agreed to
attend. This is a crucial stage in the process towards a nonracial,
democratic South Africa. While this process will
undoubtedly be a difficult one, I am deeply heartened by
the spirit of goodwill and cooperation with which parties
are approaching the negotiations.
The Commonwealth has been at the forefront of
international efforts to end apartheid in South Africa
and it is clear that its efforts have been rewarded by
the progress that has been made. At Harare in October,
Commonwealth Heads of Government pledged to assist the
transition to a non-racial South Africa.
In this spirit the Commonwealth has accepted an
invitation from CODESA's Co-Chairpersons to send
observers to this historic meeting. I welcome the
invitation and I am pleased to announce that Sir Ninian
Stephen will participate in the Commonwealth observer
team. Sir Ninian will join five other eminent representatives
from Commonwealth member states in observing the
proceedings of the two-day inaugural session of CODESA.
It is my sincere hope that CODESA will lead to the
peaceful achievement of a democratic, non-racial South
Africa. On behalf of the Australian Government and
people, I wish the participants well in the difficult
task ahead of them.
386~ 0

Transcript 8366

SPEECH BY THE PRIME MINISTER PARLIAMENTARY LUNCH IN HONOUR OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF CYPRUS, HIS EXCELLENCY MR GEORGE VASSILIOU CANBERRA - 12 DECEMBER 1991

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Hawke, Robert

Period of Service: 11/03/1983 to 20/12/1991

More information about Hawke, Robert on The National Archive website.

Release Date: 12/12/1991

Release Type: Speech

Transcript ID: 8365

PRIME MINISTER
CHECK AGATNSqT DELIVRay EMRARrOED UNTIL DFl. Tpg
SPEECH BY THE PRIME MINISTER
PARLIAMENTARY LUNCH IN HONOUR OF THE
PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF CYPRUS,
HIS EXCELLENCY MR GEORGE VASSILIOJ
CAN4BERRA 12 DECEMBER 1991
President Vassiliou
Mrs Vassiliou
Distinguished Guests
Ladies and Gentlemen
Mr President
I am very pleased you have been able to accept my invitatio
to visit Australia. It is an honour and a pleasure to have
you here.
We last met at the Commonwealth Heads of Governent Meeting
in Harare in October. The Harare CHOGM showed : he
Commonwealth to be an organisation of continuing relevance
and vitality, committed to the protection and promotion of
just and honest government, fundamental human rights and
democratic values. The commitment of your Government to th
Commonwealth and its values has been reflected iLn your
agreement to host the next CHOGM in 1993.
Mr President, during our discussions this morning, we spoke
at length about the still outstanding problem of the
partition of Cyprus. I was most interested to hear your
analysis of the present situation, and I was impressed by
your determination to find a solution.
As you know, Australia has always condemned the Turkish
occupation of Cyprus. We uphold the sovereignty and
territorial integrity of the Republic of Cyprus. And we
have supported UN Security Council Resolutions 541, 550, 64
and 716. We have consistently expressed oppositrion to the
unilateral declaration of the Turkish republic of Northern
Cyprus in 1983.
3 8 JM'T
1J

/ o 2.
We have been extensively involved in efforts to restore
peace in Cyprus through our participation in the United
Nations peacekeeping force. At present, we have 20 men and
women of the Australian Federal Police on duty there.
Those men and women, and their colleagues from many other
countries, provide an invaluable service. I have nothing
but praise and respect for them, and I am proud of the
contribution Australia has been able to make to that effort.
The search for a just, peaceful and permanent solution to
the problems of Cyprus is a major challenge to the
international community. The ability of the international
community to meet that challenge has been greatly
strengthened over recent years by the emergence of the
United Nations as a truly effective instrument of
international action.
We have fully supported the efforts of the current
Secretary-General to resolve the Cyprus problem, and we urge
his distinguished successor to continue and expand those
efforts. We also urge the United States and the European
Community to maintain the momentum for a UN-sponsored
settlement. Last year I had the opportunity to discuss the issue with
President Ozal. I pressed him then on the need for Turkey
to take decisive steps if the issue is to be resolved. I
believe he understands that it is in the interests of
Turkey, and of the whole region, that the future of Cyprus
should be resolved quickly, and in a just and durable
manner. I urge Turkey's new Prime Minister, Oemirel, to
commit himself to the search for such a resolution.
We are disappointed that prospects are now fading for a
high-level meeting between the parties before the end of the
year, but we hope the momentum can be regained early in the
new year.
I believe the momentous changes that have swept the world in
the past two years give cause for greater hope for a
settlement for Cyprus.
The old restraints of the Cold War have been broken. Old
modes of thinking are no longer relevant. And there is a
new spirit of international cooperation based on the
realisation of common goals and interests.
There are no easy answers. Imagination, flexibility and
political determinatiLon are essential.
All parties must participate constructively and openly in
inter-communal negotiations. It is time to look forward to
possibilities and op. portunities, rather than back to hatred
and bitterness.

I believe it is becoming increasingly clear, in the post-
Cold War world, that people's well-being can only be assured
through the principles I outlined earlier, those identi'f ied
and espoused by Commonwealth Heads of Government at the
Harare meeting democracy, human rights, the rule of law,
and just and honest government.
Mr President,
Australia is in a fortunate position. we are geographically
remote from much of the world's turmoil, and suffer no
immediate threats. We are rich in resources. we enjoy a
democratic system of government. And, importantly, we have
many Australians of diverse ethnic backgrounds who are
willing to contribute to Australia's well-being.
Australia is proud that, in particular since World War II,
we have attracted to our shores millions of new settlers
from more than 130 nations around the world. One of cur
great assets is the vigour and vitality of our multicultural
society.
Cypriot migration and establishment in Australia has a long
and proud history going back to the gold-rush era of the
1850s. The period of upheaval in 1974 saw a substantial
rise in immigration from Cyprus, with the result that around
50,000 Cypriots now call Australia home.
Cypriots participate in and contribute to all walks of' life
education, sport, business and government. One well-known
member of the Cypriot community who is also a member of
this Parliament is Dr Andrew Theophanous, who I know is
already known to you.
These sons and daughters of Cyprus, now Australians, are
very welcome among us. Like you, Mr President, they
personify a rich and ancient culture, and a vibrant
commitment to achievement. We have been enriched by their
contribution to our multicultural society. And we respect
the way in which they have contributed to our society and'
economy through the traditions and achievements of their
culture. Australia's multicultural society works because all
Australians are able to express and share their individual
cultural heritage, to practise their religion, to speak
their language. It works because all Australians are
treated equally. It works because there is an overriding
commitment to Australia, to its institutions, its interests
and its future.
I believe the Australian achievement of a multicultural
society has something to teach the world. Culture, history,
language and race should not divide, or become the focus of
hate diversity should enrich and invigorate society.

4.
Mr President,
Australia and Cyprus have! a close and friendly relationship,
based on our historical Links, our Commonwealth membership,
the ties of blood and cu: lture through the many Australians
of Cypriot origin and our mutual interest in seeking a just
and peaceful resolution to the partition of Cyprus.
Your visit provides the opportunity to build on these solid
foundations.
Again, we are honoured by your presence here, and wish you a
fruitful and enjoyable visit.
" rV-9TTIIT-

Transcript 8365

SPEECH BY THE PRIME MINISTER ASIA-PACIFIC PARLIAMENTARY FORUM CANBERRA - 10 DECEMBER 1991

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Hawke, Robert

Period of Service: 11/03/1983 to 20/12/1991

More information about Hawke, Robert on The National Archive website.

Release Date: 10/12/1991

Release Type: Speech

Transcript ID: 8364

CHECKC AGAINqT npELIVFRY EMNBARGO D UNTIL QFIERY~
SPEECH BY THE PRIME MINISTER
ASIA-PACIFIC PARLIAMENTARY FORUM
CANBERRA 10 DECEMBER 1991
I am very pleased that you have chosen Australia for the
second preparatory meeting of the Asia-Pacific Parliamentary
Forum. It is fitting that you are meeting in our new
national Parliament House, in our national capital. Both
capital and building are symbolic of Australia's commitment
to parliamentary democracy.
The development of relations between our region's
parliaments and parliamentarians, in my view, is crucial to
the process of breaking down barriers between nations and of
promoting mutual understanding and respect.
As we approach the 21st century, it is vital for nations in
the Asia-Pacific region to learn more of each others
political values and systems, and to understand better the
cultural bases from which they derive.
I commend the organisers of this Forum for their initiative
and farsightedness in bringing together such a distinguished
group of parliamentarians.
The parliamentary system, as instituted in one form or
another by all countries represented here today, is
essential not only for the enhancement of representative and
participatory government, but for the promotion and
preservation of political liberty itself.
In the last few years, the world has witnessed a fundamental
transformation of political life. Many countries are
discovering or re-discovering the virtues and the benefits
of representative government. Systems that have denied the
importance or relevance of parliamentary institutions are
slowly, or, in some cases dramatically, failing.
Authoritarian and totalitarian systems in Europe, Africa,
Latin America, and our own region are learning the art of
give and take, and of that necessary compromise essential to
a representative parliamentary system.
V'I 11613 1
ASM06vhk
_ IUMV-37
_ h4&%& VW

It is this philosophy of compromise which is the hallmark of
limited government, the hallmark of a state where liberty is
paramount. In this context, the establishment of the Asia-Pacific
Parliamentary Forum is an important and positive step. it
is a recognition that the region is becoming a major
political and economic grouping of countries alongside
Europe and the Americas.
It is a recognition also that the increasing intensity of
trade and investment in the region has political and social
implications which demand the attention of legislators.
The challenge for all of us is to improve the quality of
life of our peoples, to create conditions conducive to
growth and prosperity, and to maintain and enhance the
security and stability of the region.
The Forum provides us with an ideal opportunity to discuss
and exchange information on the common challenges and
problems which are confronting us all.
Speaking for Australia', no element of our international
policy over the coming years will be more important than
maintaining and increasing the momentum of our growing
enmeshmnent in the Asia-Pacific region. Our policies are
geared towards this end, and the results are plain. In the
economic area, fully 35 per cent of our total trade is now
with North East Asia, and 8.7 per cent with South East Asia,
while 55 per cent of our exports are bought by the countries
of North East and South East Asia. This compares with 49
per cent five years ago.
By the end of the century, given the economic and political
developments that are taking place, well over half of our
trade will be with the region.
Central to refocusing our regional perspective is the Asia-
Pacific Economic Co-operation ( APEC) process. Initiated in
Seoul in 1989, and carried forward over three ministerial
meetings since then, it aims to promote a broad ranging
regional dialogue which identifies and advances common
economic interests.
APEC is not designed to be an exclusive trading bloc, but
rather a grouping which promotes the liberalisation of trade
in the region. APEC provides a collective voice in broader
forums such as the GATT negotiations, and a voice that
speaks with authority. APEC provides a clear and practical
example of an open and non-discriminatory trading system.
In the political and security area, the end of the cold war,
the increasing influence of multilateral institutions such
as the United Nations, and the growth of international cooperation
on a wide variety of issues, provides us now with
an unprecedented opportunity to build a prosperous, just and
secure Asia-Pacific region. : iTIT

3.
The peace process in Cambodia, the gradual liberalisation
taking place in Vietnam, Japan's development of a political
role more in keeping with her economic importance; these
developments and others are all positive steps leading
towards regional stability and co-operation.
The Asia-Pacific Parliamentary Forum will, I am sure,
develop to become an integral part of these processes of
integration and development with the Asia-Pacific region.
I have, therefore, much pleasure in opening the second
preparatory meeting of the Forum and I wish you well in your
deliberations. I1 o

Transcript 8364

UNKNOWN

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Hawke, Robert

Period of Service: 11/03/1983 to 20/12/1991

More information about Hawke, Robert on The National Archive website.

Release Date: 06/12/1991

Release Type: Media Release

Transcript ID: 8363

K9>
PRIME MINISTER
FOR MEDIA6 DECEMBER 1991
After discussions with Mr Kerin this morning, he and I have
agreed on the need for a reallocation of Ministerial
portfolios. As recommended by me to the Governor-General, Mr Kerin will
become Minister for Transport and Communications. Mr Ralph
Willis will become Treasurer and Mr Kim Beazley will become
Minister for Finance.
I pay tribute to John's policy contribution to the
Government and to his understanding of, and agreement with,
the changes I have determined.
The Governor-General will swear in Ministers to their new
portfolios at 8.45am on Monday. 3685
~ hr

Transcript 8363

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