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Transcripts from the Prime Ministers of Australia

Transcript 2702

MACQUARIE NETWORK WEEKLY BROADCAST BY THE PRIME MINISTER, THE RT HON WILLIAM MCMAHON CH MP - THE GOVERNMENT'S RECORD - 25 OCTOBER 1972 - INTERVIEWER: PAUL LYNCH

Photo of McMahon, William

McMahon, William

Period of Service: 10/03/1971 to 05/12/1972

More information about McMahon, William on The National Archive website.

Release Date: 25/10/1972

Release Type: Interview

Transcript ID: 2702

MACQUARIE NETWORK WEEKLY BROADCAST
BY THE PRIME MINISTER, THE RT, HON.
WILLIAM McMAHON, CH, MP.
THE GOVERNMENT'S RECORD OCTOBER 1972
Interviewer Paul Lynch
Q. Prime Minister, criticism was often voiced of you as
a Prime Minister in your first months in your oresent office,
as being a man who had a good technician's interest in the
process of government and of politics, but not a man who had
a very clear * icture of where Australia would be perhaps
five or ten years from then. Do you think that in recent
months, you have altered this impression?
PM: Yes, I think first of all that the criticism is a little
unfair because I had to fit into the office and I faced
difficulties of an unparalleled kind. I don't think any other
Prime liinister had to face thc samc number and range of
difficulties that I had to face. Then when I found that the
economic conditions were changing and that I was getting
increasing control over the Party, then of course I could adopt
the proper role for a Prime Minister, and that was to take a
national approach and a vision for the future that I think has
been evident, really evident over the course of at least the
last eight to ten months.
Q. Whnich would you describe as the foremost of the new
directions that you have pointed out in the last eight to
ten months?
PM: Naturally enough, I would like to look first of all at
problems like education, of what we did in the Budget with
the reduction of taxation, of the suoport for pensioners,
and half a dozen other policy changes of a radical kind that
we introduced there. T would like to look at the health changes
that we made, and our chanaes in international relations as
well.
Q. In terms of international relations, Prime Minister, what
new directions do you see there? / 2

2-
PM: In recent days we have become a member of the United
Nations Security Council which has the problem of looking
after world peace. We have become c wember of the Organisation
for Economic Co-operation and Development, one of the most
importz-1. -onomic committees that there is. Recently a
delegati(. came from Japan, headed by Mr Ohira, accompanied
by four ocher very senior Ministers, to talk over our common
economic, trade and social relationships. All these indicate
that other countries are very interested in us, they know the
influence we have in the Pacific Theatre, and they are confident
that we in Australia will play our Dart in trying to ensure
peace in this area and make our contribution to development
at the same time.
Q. In domestic terms, Prime Minister, you have been talking
more or less about the matter of relationships between
governments relationships between Australians and the way
individual Australians lead their lives. What i'o you think
are the most significant changes for which you would care to
take responsibility?
PM: First of all I would have to mention the taxation changes
and the changes relating to social services, welfare, housing
and also hospitals and medical attention. These all concern
and affect the individual. But we have gone even wider than
that in the education and arts. We have done more in actual
performances than I can remember has ever been done before.
We have assisted, too, with conservation and environment, and
we have done a lot to help the aborigines. So that if you
look at these cultural matters, then I think you can accept
the fact, nce you look at the record, that these have been
remarkable developments and they are taking us into a new
kind of a world, and a new vision of the kind of world you
want for succeeding generations of Australians, because I believe
now, we must concentrate more and more on youth and give them
the opportunity to express themselves, to find delight in their
surroundings, and to be able to fully join in every aspect of
the life of the community.
Q. Final point, Prime Minister, and fairly briefly, I'p
afraid to out to you the question that it was claimed you
couldn't answer in the middle of last year : What do you see
as being the future of Austraha?
PM: I don't know of any country at all that has a brighter
prospect than we have, providing only we have sound and
sensible government and proper management of the business of
state. We are a wealthy country. We can become increasingly
wealthy. We can give our people greater opportunities than
they have ever had before. We can give them the education
they need, the health services and the housing they need,
and this, after all, is the foundation on which they, the
people themselves, can spread their wings and I think get into
a new age of a new development that will bring a great deal of
contentment and happiness to them.
Prime Minister, thank you very mv'ch.

Transcript 2702