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Transcripts from the Prime Ministers of Australia

Transcript 2609

PRESIDENT NIXON'S VISIT TO THE USSR - STATEMENT BY THE PRIME MINISTER, THE RT HON WILLIAM MCMAHON CH MP

Photo of McMahon, William

McMahon, William

Period of Service: 10/03/1971 to 05/12/1972

More information about McMahon, William on The National Archive website.

Release Date: 01/06/1972

Release Type: Media Release

Transcript ID: 2609

PRIME MINISTER
FOR PRESS: PM. No. 56/ 1972
PRESIDE'T i'IXOS VISIT TO THE U. S. S. R.
Statement by the Prime Minister, the Rt Hon. William
McMahon, M. P.
The Prime Minister, Mr. McMahon, today described President
Nixon's recent visit to the Soviet Union as another massive
stride along the road toward-reducing international tensions and
another contribution towards making the world a more peaceful
place in which to live in freedom and peace of mind.
In Mr. Nixon's own words, " a foundation has been laid for a
new relationship between the two most powerful nations in the
world." Mr. McMahon said that the Australian Government welcomed
the agreements signed during the summit meeting and applauded
the President's initiative and the constructive approach that
both the United States and the Soviet Union has taken in their
discussions in Moscow. The agreements limited strategic arms
were clearly a signifi: Fai-t achievement.
They could well mark an historic turning point in the efforts
to halt the arms race aid to bring a'out a meaningful relaxation
of world tension.
Mr. McMahon also said he believed that the declaration of
basic principles between the U. S. A. and the U. S. S. R. was
significant both in substance and psychologically.
The declared principles opened up new avenues for the
development of the future relationship between the two super-powers
and must make a contribut-ion towards detente between east and west.
Of particular importance is the undertaking both nations have
given to exercise restraint in their mutual relations and to
negotiate and settle differences by peaceful means. Among these
were Vietnam and the Middle East.
The Prime Minister also sa'd that there are satisfying reasons
for expressing our gratitude to President Nixon for the initiatives
he had taken towards opening up consultations with Peking and Moscow.
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92. A real contribution had been made towards reducing many of the
previously existing regid in i. ne: aticr. al : f; airs and
the tensions which have cxi . te. i cn ' tcse three great nations.
Whilst the long-term results o visits will be seen in the
future, the missions had achieved their main purpose.
They had given grounds for the hope that a new era has commenced
an era in which all nations can pursue their aspirations for social
and economic progress in an atmosphere of peaceful co-operation.

Transcript 2609